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South Sudan

Official Name:
Republic of South Sudan

National Designated Entity

Type of organisation:
Government/Ministry
Name:
Mr. David Batali Oliver Samson
Position:
Director of Pollution Control Department
Phone:
+211 955181821
Emails:
db_oliver@ymail.com

Energy profile

South Sudan (2012)

Type: 
Energy profile
Energy profile
Extent of network

Currently, the electricity network of South Sudan consists of three decentralised generation plants, each with a localised distribution network, serving the capital city of Juba and the state capitals of Malakau and Wau. Approximately 1% of the population had access to electricity services in 2011, the majority of these being in Juba.

Renewable energy potential

Solar energySolar potentials in the South are approximately 6.9 GJ/m2/year, or 436 W/m2/year. The region receives on average, 8 hours of sunshine daily, making it ideally placed to utilise solar energy resources. The potential has been recognised for use in rural electrification, particularly solar electric lighting, through LEDs. Solar energy currently powers some radio stations in the country, and approximately 45,000 households have some form of energy service derived from solar resources. Wind energyWind power density in the Southern region ranges from 285 – 380 W/ m2. Wind power generation is seen as a key investment opportunity by the government of South Sudan, and some independent investors are making use of wind power for rural electrification. Biomass energyTraditional biomass fuels provide for the vast majority of the South Sudanese population’s energy needs. An estimated 71.1 million hectares of biomass resource exists in the country, of which 29.3 million cubic metres are deemed to be the allowable cut. Agricultural residues, as well as animal wastes, could also hold significant potential. Geothermal energyThe country is currently seeking assistance from the Kenyan Geothermal Development Company to undertake a thorough assessment of its geothermal resource. Due to its geographical location, geothermal resources are expected to be developed, and the GDC has expressed a keen interest in lending South Sudan technical assistance and co-operation in the development of this resource. HydropowerPre-independence, the total annual electricity production from Sudan’s hydropower resources was estimated at 24,132 GWh. South Sudan holds the majority of the country’s small-hydro potential, with an estimated 67,000 MWh being available annually. In 2010, the government of South Sudan announced its intention to build eleven new hydroelectric projects along the White Nile in the coming years.

Energy framework

Currently, national energy policy primarily consists of oil sector policy, and the re-development of key petroleum resources and items of infrastructure. Oil production from South Sudan was shut down in the weeks leading to the end of January 2012, whilst administrative and technical factors were assessed, and investigations into alleged oil thefts and withholdings by the North were conducted. Petrodar, the consortium predominantly owned by the China National Petroleum Corporation which operates some of South Sudan’s major export routes, reported that a lag period of 40 days to six months, depending on the duration of the shutdown, could be expected before production commenced again. Programs to promote sustainable energy use and uptake are limited in the country presently, due to the country’s infancy as an independent nation. The Ministry of Energy and Mining is, however, committed to the identification of all potential hydropower resources in the country, as well as other sustainable energy sources, and the facilitation of their use for power generation.

Source
Static Source:
  • Communicating Extreme Weather Event Attribution: Research from Kenya and India

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    Climate change attribution analysis assesses the likelihood that a particular extreme weather event has been made more or less likely as a result of anthropogenic climate change. Communication of extreme event attribution information in the immediate aftermath of an extreme event provides a window of opportunity to inform, educate, and affect a change in attitude or behaviour in order to mitigate or prepare for climate change.

  • Hydrological Zoning

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Sectors:

    Hydrological zoning (or simply zoning) is an approach to divide land into different zones based on their hydrological properties. Typically, each type of zone has different land use and development regulations linked to it. This land and water management method aims to protect local water sources from risks of over-abstraction, land salinization, groundwater pollution and waterlogging by managing land use activities based on the assigned hydrological zones.  For example, zones with a high groundwater table, large amounts of surface water (e.g.

  • Pöyry Austria GmbH

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Austria
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    Pöyry Austria GmbH, a member of the global Pöyry Group, is a consulting and engineering company with deep expertise with extensive local knowledge to deliver sustainable project investments. For instance, its Hydro Consulting department delivers services in the fields of hydrological and hydraulic modellingand forecasting. Its experts have significant experience in the fields of hydro-meteorology, climate change and climate sensitivity. They also contribute to assess climate risk and ctimate adaptation measures for hydropower and all other sectors of water management.

  • Energy Efficiency (Policies and Measures Database)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The Energy Efficiency Policies and Measures database provides information on policies and measures taken or planned to improve energy efficiency. The database further supports the IEA G8 Gleneagles Plan of Action mandate to “share best practice between participating governments”, and the agreement by IEA Energy Ministers in 2009 to promote energy efficiency and close policy gaps.

  • Green Resources & Energy Analysis Tool (GREAT)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The GREAT Tool for Cities is an integrated bottom-up, energy end-use based modelling and accounting tool for tracking energy consumption, production and resource extraction in all economic sectors on a city, provincial or regional level. The model uses the Long-range Energy Alternatives Planning System (LEAP) software developed by the Stockholm Environmental Institute and includes a national average dataset on energy input parameters for residential, commercial, transport, industry and agriculture end-use sectors.

  • Commercial Building Analysis Tool for Energy-Efficient Retrofits (COMBAT)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The Commercial Building Analysis Tool for Energy-Efficiency Retrofit (COMBAT) is created to facilitate policy makers, facility managers, and building retrofit practitioners to estimate commercial (public) buildings retrofit energy saving, cost and payback period. Common commercial building models area created, and the retrofit measures and their effects are pre-computed by EnergyPlus by taking different building types and measures interactions into account.

  • Local Energy Efficiency Policy Calculator (LEEP-C)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    The tool provides the opportunity to analyse the impacts of 23 different policy types from 4 energy-using sectors:

    1. public buildings,
    2. commercial buildings,
    3. residential buildings, and
    4. transportation.

    Impacts of policy choices are analysed in terms of energy savings, cost savings, pollution reduction, and other outcomes over a time period set by the user. The tool also allows for assigning the weights to different policy options based on community priorities in order to tailor policy development process to community goals.

  • Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Germany
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    The Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht-Zentrum für Material-und Küstenforschung GmbH (HZG) is one of 18 members of the Helmholtz Association of German Research Centres Germany's largest science organization. One of HZG's scientific organizational entities is the Climate Service Center Germany (GERICS), a think tank for innovations in the field of climate services.