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Senegal

Official Name:
Republic of Senegal

National Designated Entity

Type of organisation:
Specialized agency
Name:
Mr. Issakha Youm
Phone:
+221 3 38 25 04 43
Emails:
iyoum2@yahoo.fr

Energy profile

Senegal (2014)

Type: 
Energy profile
Energy profile
Extent of network

In 2011, Senegal’s national access to electricity was estimated at 40%, with an urban electrification rate of 70% and rural electrification of 22%. 47 MW of non-grid connected installed capacity serves isolated centres in areas away from the main grid.

Renewable energy potential

SolarSenegal is endowed with a large solar energy resource. Over most of country’s territory, the solar irradiation is above 2 000 kWh /m2/year for Global Horizontal Irradiation and above 1,800 kWh/m2/year for Direct Normal Irradiation (Ministere des Energies Renouvelables, 2011). This provides good prospects for photovoltaic solar power projects. The falling prices of photovoltaic panels and system components make solar a very attractive solution, particularly when the costs of the alternatives – imported oil products – are high.Wind EnergySenegal’s wind power potential is concentrated along the coast and in particular the section of the coast between Dakar and Saint-Louis. In a study carried out by the Senegal Meteorological Service, wind velocities of 3.7-6.1 m/s were observed in the 50 km-long coastal strip between Dakar and St. Louis.HydroSenegal has about 3 billion cubic meters per year of renewable groundwater resources, excluding those groundwater resources that overlap with surface water. Total water withdrawals in 1987 were 1.4 billion cubic meters, of which 92% is for agriculture, 3% for industry and 5% for domestic use. The Senegal River represents a significant hydroelectric potential estimated at 1,200 MW and partially exploited at Manantali plant (200 MW) commissioned in 2002, providing electricity to Senegal, Mali and Mauritania via a 225 KV interconnection line.Biomass and BiofuelSolid biomass (agricultural and agribusiness by-products) and liquid biofuels also have potential in parts of the country. As mentioned earlier, biomass is the dominant source of energy in Senegal providing more than 50% of the national energy balance. Biomass resources, such as agricultural by-products (approximately 3.3 million dry tons of agricultural residues) agribusiness (rice husk, bagasse, peanut shells, cotton stalks, etc.), also have the potential for grid-distributed and off-grid electricity generation (Ibid). Plant species (plant oil, jatropha curcas, cat-tails, sunflower, cotton, castor, sweet sorghum etc.) also have potential for biofuel production.

Energy framework

Letter of Development Policy for the Energy SectorIn October 2012, the GoS adopted a Letter of Development Policy for the Energy Sector. The Letter of Development Policy outlines the sector policy objectives of the newly elected government to improve the sector’s performance in the medium term. The main axes of the Letter of Development Policy for the Energy Sector are: (a) ensuring energy security and increasing the energy access for all; (b) developing a policy mix combining thermal generation, bio-energy, coal, gas, and renewables and seizing the opportunities of regional interconnections; (c) continuing and accelerating the liberalization of the energy sector by encouraging independent production and institutional reform of the sector; (d) improving the competitiveness of the sector in order to lower the cost of energy and reduce sector subsidies; and (e) strengthening regulation of the sector.The 2013-2017 plan for developing production facilities is based on an energy policy mix combining coal, natural gas, hydroelectricity, and renewable energies. In addition to the rehabilitation of SENELEC’s production facilities, which are in progress, this plan makes provision for the following additional capacities: the Félou hydroelectric power station of 15 MW in 2013, an IPP in the amount of 150 MW (liquefied natural gas) in April 2014, the IPP Tobéne (Taiba Ndiaye) of 70 MW in 2014, a coal-fired IPP (Sendou) of 125 MW in April 2015; an import of 80 MW from the natural gas powered plant in Mauritania in October 2015; a coal-fired IPP with Kepco of 250 MW between 2016 and 2017, and renewable energy projects. A standing inter-ministerial committee for monitoring energy projects has been instituted. The coming on stream of these new units will be accompanied, at current oil prices, by the phase-out of the electricity subsidy and will lead over time to lower costs for the user.To react to the power crisis, in 2010, the GoS carried out a diagnostic exercise of the sector, which highlighted an increasing gap between fast growing demand and insufficient, costly, and unreliable supply of electricity, as well as SENELEC’s persistent financial difficulties, characterized by a significant operating deficit and high indebtedness. To tackle both technical and financial imbalances, the GoS developed a 2011 – 2015 electricity emergency plan, outlining the overall policy framework and strategy to steer the sector towards a sustainable path and ensure SENELEC’s financial and operational sustainability over the long run.The GoS also set up a special fund to support fuel provision for electricity generation (the Special Fund for Energy – FSE). The FSE became operational in July 2011 and it finances fuel supplies to SENELEC and co-finances investments in new infrastructure, particularly generation expansion. The Fund’s revenues are financed through GoS budgetary transfers (including tariff compensation), charges on oil products, energy and telecommunications, and a contribution from SENELEC. 

Source
Static Source:
  • Communicating Extreme Weather Event Attribution: Research from Kenya and India

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    Climate change attribution analysis assesses the likelihood that a particular extreme weather event has been made more or less likely as a result of anthropogenic climate change. Communication of extreme event attribution information in the immediate aftermath of an extreme event provides a window of opportunity to inform, educate, and affect a change in attitude or behaviour in order to mitigate or prepare for climate change.

  • Hydrological Zoning

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Sectors:

    Hydrological zoning (or simply zoning) is an approach to divide land into different zones based on their hydrological properties. Typically, each type of zone has different land use and development regulations linked to it. This land and water management method aims to protect local water sources from risks of over-abstraction, land salinization, groundwater pollution and waterlogging by managing land use activities based on the assigned hydrological zones.  For example, zones with a high groundwater table, large amounts of surface water (e.g.

  • Pöyry Austria GmbH

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Austria
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    Pöyry Austria GmbH, a member of the global Pöyry Group, is a consulting and engineering company with deep expertise with extensive local knowledge to deliver sustainable project investments. For instance, its Hydro Consulting department delivers services in the fields of hydrological and hydraulic modellingand forecasting. Its experts have significant experience in the fields of hydro-meteorology, climate change and climate sensitivity. They also contribute to assess climate risk and ctimate adaptation measures for hydropower and all other sectors of water management.

  • Tambourine Innovation Ventures Inc.

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    United States
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    Incorporated in 2015, Tambourine Innovation Ventures (TIV) is an innovation advisory and venture development firm that provides a full suite of services and solutions to the challenges and needs generated by the increasing interest and activity globally in the areas of climate change adaptation/mitigation, innovation, technology transfer and venture finance. TIV founders and consultants bring more than three decades of experience in assisting the developing countries access innovative technologies from the industrialized countries and grow technology ventures.

  • Energy Efficiency (Policies and Measures Database)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The Energy Efficiency Policies and Measures database provides information on policies and measures taken or planned to improve energy efficiency. The database further supports the IEA G8 Gleneagles Plan of Action mandate to “share best practice between participating governments”, and the agreement by IEA Energy Ministers in 2009 to promote energy efficiency and close policy gaps.

  • Green Resources & Energy Analysis Tool (GREAT)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The GREAT Tool for Cities is an integrated bottom-up, energy end-use based modelling and accounting tool for tracking energy consumption, production and resource extraction in all economic sectors on a city, provincial or regional level. The model uses the Long-range Energy Alternatives Planning System (LEAP) software developed by the Stockholm Environmental Institute and includes a national average dataset on energy input parameters for residential, commercial, transport, industry and agriculture end-use sectors.

  • Commercial Building Analysis Tool for Energy-Efficient Retrofits (COMBAT)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The Commercial Building Analysis Tool for Energy-Efficiency Retrofit (COMBAT) is created to facilitate policy makers, facility managers, and building retrofit practitioners to estimate commercial (public) buildings retrofit energy saving, cost and payback period. Common commercial building models area created, and the retrofit measures and their effects are pre-computed by EnergyPlus by taking different building types and measures interactions into account.