Connecting countries to climate technology solutions
English Arabic Chinese (Simplified) French Russian Spanish Yoruba

Sierra Leone

Official Name:
Republic of Sierra Leone

National Designated Entity

Type of organisation:
Government/Ministry
Name:
Mr. Ibrahim Sinneh Kamara
Position:
Director General
Phone:
+23230333730
Emails:
sinneh71@gmail.com

Energy profile

Sierra Leone (2012)

Type: 
Energy profile
Energy profile
Extent of network

Under the current electricity capacity constraints, only 2% of households or 40,000 customers (mostly in or near Freetown) have access to electricity. The majority of the interior does not have access to electricity, and the country's four major cities consume 90% of the available electricity. The transmission and distribution network in the country is primarily consisted of the Freetown system and its surroundings, with the only other major provincial grid servicing Bo-Kenema.

Renewable energy potential

Solar energyThe country experiences sunshine for majority of the year. A recent study estimated the average daily solar radiation at 4.1-5.2 kWh/m2, which indicates significant potential for solar power. This data is in need of revision, as calculations were made from eight sites in 1996. The economic feasibility of photovoltaic (PV) electricity needs to be further explored.The current installed capacity of solar PV is about 25 kW, with 60–80 % being installed by the RCD Solar Company. It provides 120 W/4 kW solar systems for hospitals, schools, domestic and commercial use. Significant work has also been done by the Environmental Foundation for Africa (EFA).Wind energyData on wind speeds across the country is rare. The existing data indicates a countrywide average speed of 3–5 m/s. However, wind speeds of up to 12 m/s seem to be possible in some areas so wind power may offer very promising opportunities for Sierra Leone. The Ministry of Energy and Power (MEP) is encouraging studies of sites that may hold potential. With wind turbines capable of operating with low wind speeds now on the market, there is a strong potential for these systems in rural areas, especially in the north. There is currently no wind energy system in Sierra Leone.Biomass energyBiomass potential is high, from forest resources, and 656,400 tons of crop waste annually, amounting to a total generation potential of 2,706 GWh. Potential feedstocks include rice husks and straw. However, at the current deforestation rate, and with 65 % of the population living in rural areas, the harvesting of traditional fuels can lead to environmental, health and social impacts. In terms of biofuels, a recent initiative led by Addax Bioenergy, a Swiss group, with financing from a number of different international development organisations, is to construct a biomass-fueled power plant and sugarcane ethanol refinery in the country, at a total cost of €258 million. The refinery is expected to produce up to 90 million litres of ethanol annually, and will be powered entirely through the conjoined biomass station, which will also feed renewable power into the national grid system.Geothermal energyNo study has yet been conducted into the geothermal potential of Sierra Leone, and there are no current uses of the technology in the country.HydropowerThe estimated hydroelectric potential is 1,513 MW from roughly 27 different sites. Nearly all however, suffer from enormous flow variation between the wet and dry seasons. According to the Lahmeyer International report (1996), only two of the 27 sites studied in the Master Plan are deemed to provide hydropower at attractive costs and with annual flow regulation. Yiben II, Bekongor III, Kambatibo, Betmai III, and Yiben I are the most promising plants in terms of generation cost. Presently, Sierra Leone has two hydroelectric plants. These are the 2.4 MW Guma plant, installed in 1967 in the Western Area, which has been out of service since 1982 and the only operational 6 MW run-of-the-river type located in the Eastern Province. This plant is operated by the BKPS consortium, and is connected to a regional grid linking thermal power plants in Bo and Kenema. The Bumbuna Falls plant, after nearly two decades of successive governmental promises, was finally commissioned in 2009, and currently provides approximately 50 MW in the wet season, and 18 MW in the dry. The plant is linked to the Freetown electricity grid through a 161 kV connecting line.Many of the rivers investigated suffice for only small to medium hydro systems (i.e. 1–100 MW), but there is also a potential for pico to mini hydro systems (5 kW to 1 MW).  Resources under 2 MW are expected to be an area of potential for Public Private Partnerships (PPP). Long-term plans in the hydropower sector include the further expansion of the Bumbuna facility by 275 MW, and further expansion of the Bekongor facility to 200 MW of total capacity.

Energy framework

The United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA) provided funding to the government in 2004 for a study leading to the formulation of a national energy policy for the country.Based on an assessment of the existing institutional framework as well as energy demand and supply patterns, a document draft entitled “The Energy Policy for Sierra Leone” was produced..As defined in the energy policy draft document, the main policy target for electricity is to provide access for 35 % of the population by 2015.No proposed contribution of renewable energy to the electricity generation mix was mentioned. The following policy statements, however, relate to the promotion of RE:formation of financial and administrative institutions to manage RE,consideration of tax reductions and incentives for RE equipment,manufacturing RE equipment to  encourage investments,establishing sustainable financing mechanisms to make RE more accessible,ensuring that RE producers and importers meet  certified performance and technical standards,encouragement of solar water heating in hospitals, clinics, boarding homes.measures to allay the fear of using solar cookers in rural areas,encouragement of co-operatives and energy service companies to facilitate the financing mechanism for sustainable  RETs,encouragement of local manufacturing of RE generator systems,establishment of codes of practice, guidelines and standards for RE.In April 2010, the Government announced the launch of the National Energy Policy Implementation Strategy, launched at the start of Sierra Leone’s first Renewable Energy Week, and sets out plans for achieving the goals established in the National Energy Policy.According to the country’s second-generation Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper for 2009-2011, a key government objective is the provision of a reliable power supply in the country; moving toward a low carbon energy economy through use of the country’s significant hydropower potential.

Source
Static Source:
  • Communicating Extreme Weather Event Attribution: Research from Kenya and India

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    Climate change attribution analysis assesses the likelihood that a particular extreme weather event has been made more or less likely as a result of anthropogenic climate change. Communication of extreme event attribution information in the immediate aftermath of an extreme event provides a window of opportunity to inform, educate, and affect a change in attitude or behaviour in order to mitigate or prepare for climate change.

  • Hydrological Zoning

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Sectors:

    Hydrological zoning (or simply zoning) is an approach to divide land into different zones based on their hydrological properties. Typically, each type of zone has different land use and development regulations linked to it. This land and water management method aims to protect local water sources from risks of over-abstraction, land salinization, groundwater pollution and waterlogging by managing land use activities based on the assigned hydrological zones.  For example, zones with a high groundwater table, large amounts of surface water (e.g.

  • Pöyry Austria GmbH

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Austria
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    Pöyry Austria GmbH, a member of the global Pöyry Group, is a consulting and engineering company with deep expertise with extensive local knowledge to deliver sustainable project investments. For instance, its Hydro Consulting department delivers services in the fields of hydrological and hydraulic modellingand forecasting. Its experts have significant experience in the fields of hydro-meteorology, climate change and climate sensitivity. They also contribute to assess climate risk and ctimate adaptation measures for hydropower and all other sectors of water management.

  • Tambourine Innovation Ventures Inc.

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    United States
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    Incorporated in 2015, Tambourine Innovation Ventures (TIV) is an innovation advisory and venture development firm that provides a full suite of services and solutions to the challenges and needs generated by the increasing interest and activity globally in the areas of climate change adaptation/mitigation, innovation, technology transfer and venture finance. TIV founders and consultants bring more than three decades of experience in assisting the developing countries access innovative technologies from the industrialized countries and grow technology ventures.

  • Energy Efficiency (Policies and Measures Database)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The Energy Efficiency Policies and Measures database provides information on policies and measures taken or planned to improve energy efficiency. The database further supports the IEA G8 Gleneagles Plan of Action mandate to “share best practice between participating governments”, and the agreement by IEA Energy Ministers in 2009 to promote energy efficiency and close policy gaps.

  • Green Resources & Energy Analysis Tool (GREAT)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The GREAT Tool for Cities is an integrated bottom-up, energy end-use based modelling and accounting tool for tracking energy consumption, production and resource extraction in all economic sectors on a city, provincial or regional level. The model uses the Long-range Energy Alternatives Planning System (LEAP) software developed by the Stockholm Environmental Institute and includes a national average dataset on energy input parameters for residential, commercial, transport, industry and agriculture end-use sectors.

  • Commercial Building Analysis Tool for Energy-Efficient Retrofits (COMBAT)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The Commercial Building Analysis Tool for Energy-Efficiency Retrofit (COMBAT) is created to facilitate policy makers, facility managers, and building retrofit practitioners to estimate commercial (public) buildings retrofit energy saving, cost and payback period. Common commercial building models area created, and the retrofit measures and their effects are pre-computed by EnergyPlus by taking different building types and measures interactions into account.

  • Local Energy Efficiency Policy Calculator (LEEP-C)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    The tool provides the opportunity to analyse the impacts of 23 different policy types from 4 energy-using sectors:

    1. public buildings,
    2. commercial buildings,
    3. residential buildings, and
    4. transportation.

    Impacts of policy choices are analysed in terms of energy savings, cost savings, pollution reduction, and other outcomes over a time period set by the user. The tool also allows for assigning the weights to different policy options based on community priorities in order to tailor policy development process to community goals.