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Niger

Official Name:
Republic of Niger

National Designated Entity

Type of organisation:
Government/Ministry
Name:
Mr. Kamayé Maâzou
Position:
Secrétaire Exécutif du CNEDD
Phone:
+227 207 22559
Emails:
kamayemaazou@yahoo.fr

Energy profile

Niger (2012)

Type: 
Energy profile
Energy profile
Extent of network

At national level, access to electricity climbed from 6.7% to 9.3% between 1998 and 2006. The Accelerated Development and Poverty Reduction Strategy for 2008-2012 aims to raise the household access rate to 3% in rural areas and 65% in urban areas by the end of the program.The majority of the grid electricity found in the country is imported from Nigeria (90%). This is done by means of a 260 km, 132 kV line.

Renewable energy potential

Solar energyThe average solar energy potential ranges between 5 and 7 kWh/m2/day, while the average period of sunshine varies between 7 and 10 hours per day. In 2006, the power installed in the sector of solar photovoltaic (PV) was estimated at 1,170 kWp. The current use of solar thermal energy (hot water) accounts for about 2,000 m² of absorbers. The use of solar cooking and drying is very low, but significant potential exists for the development of solar cooking, with Niger being rated the 15th most viable country in the world for further uptake of the technology by Solar Cookers International.Wind energyThe average wind speed is 5 m/s in the northern part of the country and about 2.5 m/s in the south, indicating a moderate potential for wind power utilisation in the country. Currently, about 30 small-scale installations are used for water pumping purposes.Biomass energyThe potential for energy from biomass is substantial in Niger. Household biomass use is amongst the highest in Africa, with the vast majority relying on fuel wood for heating, lighting and domestic tasks. Current forested potential amounts to 9.9 million hectares, with a further 59 Mt of animal and agricultural wastes. Biogas is only used at experimental scale, with an estimated potential of nearly 1 million hectares, and an exploited potential of 100. Currently, about 10 small-scale biodigesters (primarily of the dome type) are in operation.Geothermal energyNo specific study into the potential for geothermal power generation has been conducted for the country. However, numerous geothermal analyses have been performed due to exploration for oil, revealing the presence of geothermal basins in Niger, which, with further investigation, may prove viable for generating power.HydropowerNiger has roughly 270 MW of undeveloped hydro-electric potential, primarily in the form of the Niger river, and its potential for damming. Current projects include the 125 MW Kandadji project, 200 km upstream from Niamey, the capital, as well as two smaller dams at Gambou (122 MW) and Dyodyonga (26 MW). Small hydroelectric sites in the country have the potential to produce nearly 8 GWh per year, most notably Sirba, and Gouroub Dargol.

Energy framework

The statement for energy policy adopted by the government in 2004 has been followed by many action plans for the promotion of RE. Stratégie Nationale sur les Énergies Renouvelables (SNER, National Renewable Energies Strategy) aims to increase the contribution of RE to the national energy balance from less than 0.1% in 2003, to 10% by 2020, by:Facilitating the promotion of RE supply systems,Reducing the impact on forest resources,Promoting rural electrification on the basis of RE resources,Promoting education, training, research and development related to RE technologies.The Stratégie Nationale d'Accès aux Services Energétiques Modernes (SNASEM, National Strategy for Access to Modern Energy Services) aims to increase the percentage of the population with access to modern energies by 2015, through granting:Access to modern fuels for cooking,Access to motive power for villages with 1,000–2,000 inhabitants,Access to electricity for rural and peri-urban populations, to reach a cover rate of 66%.The Stratégie Nationale des Energies Domestiques (SNED, National Strategy for Domestic Energies) aims to create a coherent framework for  the sub-sector of domestic energies, by:Assuring the sustainable use of forest resources and better reforestation,Promoting alternative sources of energy (other than wood) and improving the efficiency of the appliances used ,Strengthening the capacity of the main market actors for a better management of the sector,Setting up communication to inform and educate the actors on issues related to the production and use of domestic energies.The Accelerated Development and Poverty Reduction Strategy (SDRP 2008-2012) plans to endow the country with economic infrastructures through its “Development of Infrastructures” program. It is intended to stimulate the growth of, and facilitate access to, social facilities by promoting RE. The Stratégie du Développement Rural (SDR, Strategy for Rural Development) with its sub-program “Renewable Energy and Rural Electrification” considers improving the population's access to electricity to help rural communities in developing their local economy, and the improvement of their living conditions. The same strategy plans in its program “Environmental Protection” the promotion of the use of alternative sources of energy as a substitute for wood.

Source
Static Source:
  • Communicating Extreme Weather Event Attribution: Research from Kenya and India

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    Climate change attribution analysis assesses the likelihood that a particular extreme weather event has been made more or less likely as a result of anthropogenic climate change. Communication of extreme event attribution information in the immediate aftermath of an extreme event provides a window of opportunity to inform, educate, and affect a change in attitude or behaviour in order to mitigate or prepare for climate change.

  • Hydrological Zoning

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Sectors:

    Hydrological zoning (or simply zoning) is an approach to divide land into different zones based on their hydrological properties. Typically, each type of zone has different land use and development regulations linked to it. This land and water management method aims to protect local water sources from risks of over-abstraction, land salinization, groundwater pollution and waterlogging by managing land use activities based on the assigned hydrological zones.  For example, zones with a high groundwater table, large amounts of surface water (e.g.

  • Pöyry Austria GmbH

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Austria
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    Pöyry Austria GmbH, a member of the global Pöyry Group, is a consulting and engineering company with deep expertise with extensive local knowledge to deliver sustainable project investments. For instance, its Hydro Consulting department delivers services in the fields of hydrological and hydraulic modellingand forecasting. Its experts have significant experience in the fields of hydro-meteorology, climate change and climate sensitivity. They also contribute to assess climate risk and ctimate adaptation measures for hydropower and all other sectors of water management.

  • Tambourine Innovation Ventures Inc.

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    United States
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    Incorporated in 2015, Tambourine Innovation Ventures (TIV) is an innovation advisory and venture development firm that provides a full suite of services and solutions to the challenges and needs generated by the increasing interest and activity globally in the areas of climate change adaptation/mitigation, innovation, technology transfer and venture finance. TIV founders and consultants bring more than three decades of experience in assisting the developing countries access innovative technologies from the industrialized countries and grow technology ventures.

  • Energy Efficiency (Policies and Measures Database)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The Energy Efficiency Policies and Measures database provides information on policies and measures taken or planned to improve energy efficiency. The database further supports the IEA G8 Gleneagles Plan of Action mandate to “share best practice between participating governments”, and the agreement by IEA Energy Ministers in 2009 to promote energy efficiency and close policy gaps.

  • Green Resources & Energy Analysis Tool (GREAT)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The GREAT Tool for Cities is an integrated bottom-up, energy end-use based modelling and accounting tool for tracking energy consumption, production and resource extraction in all economic sectors on a city, provincial or regional level. The model uses the Long-range Energy Alternatives Planning System (LEAP) software developed by the Stockholm Environmental Institute and includes a national average dataset on energy input parameters for residential, commercial, transport, industry and agriculture end-use sectors.

  • Commercial Building Analysis Tool for Energy-Efficient Retrofits (COMBAT)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The Commercial Building Analysis Tool for Energy-Efficiency Retrofit (COMBAT) is created to facilitate policy makers, facility managers, and building retrofit practitioners to estimate commercial (public) buildings retrofit energy saving, cost and payback period. Common commercial building models area created, and the retrofit measures and their effects are pre-computed by EnergyPlus by taking different building types and measures interactions into account.

  • Local Energy Efficiency Policy Calculator (LEEP-C)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    The tool provides the opportunity to analyse the impacts of 23 different policy types from 4 energy-using sectors:

    1. public buildings,
    2. commercial buildings,
    3. residential buildings, and
    4. transportation.

    Impacts of policy choices are analysed in terms of energy savings, cost savings, pollution reduction, and other outcomes over a time period set by the user. The tool also allows for assigning the weights to different policy options based on community priorities in order to tailor policy development process to community goals.