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Malawi

Official Name:
Republic of Malawi

National Designated Entity

Type of organisation:
Name:
Mr. Lyson Kampira
Position:
Chief Research Services Officer
Phone:
+265 1 771 550, +265 999 916 036
Emails:
lkampira@ncst.mw, lkampira@yahoo.com

Energy profile

Malawi (2012)

Type: 
Energy profile
Energy profile
Extent of network

Only 8% of the Malawian population currently benefit from a grid-connected electricity supply.  Moreover, the national grid almost exclusively serves urban and peri-urban areas – around 25% of urban households have electricity, compared to 1% of rural households.  As such, the 85% of Malawians that live in rural areas are not served by grid-connected electricity and the great majority of the rural population is unlikely to be grid-connected in the near future, even with national grid extension programmes such as The Malawi Rural Electrification Project (MAREP).

Renewable energy potential

With large lakeshore area with Mwera winds, Malawi has exceptional wind resources. Researchers have found that Malawi could meet all their electricity demands from wind power through 2030. Construction of the first wind farm in Malawi will start early 2010 at Chilunguzi Farm; Mwasinja Village, Dedza. The wind farm is scheduled to be completed by end of 2010.Solar Cookers International has ranked Malawi as 20th in the world for solar cooking potential. The estimated number of people in Malawi with fuel scarcity in 2020 is 2,700,000. In 2009, a small-scale underground biogas plant has been established by the Test & Training Centre in Renewable Energy Technologies (TCRET) at Mzuzu University, one of the public universities in Malawi. By the end of the project in 2011 there were 12 biogas digesters installed. 

Energy framework

The Malawi Growth and Development Strategy 2006-2011 (MGDS) set out the government’s economic growth and development priorities for five years. The MGDS identified energy, along with five other key priority areas, as a crucial input for industrial processing. The government recognizes that the power sector is a key constraint to Malawi’s economic growth. The objective of the MGDS was to reduce the number and duration of blackouts, increase access to reliable and affordable electricity in rural areas and other targeted areas, and improve coordination between the needs for energy for households and those of other high growth sectors such as tourism and mining. The second MGDS 2 (2011-2016) is not yet published.In addition to the MGDS, a National Energy Policy (NEP) was approved in 2003 and is the responsibility of the Department of Energy Affairs (DoEA).  The policy resulted in the formation of the Malawi Energy Regulatory Authority (MERA) and was influential in a recent restructuring of the The Electricity Supply Corporation of Malawi (ESCOM), while continuing to guide energy development within the country.As part of the NEP, a Renewable Energy Framework has been in development for some time. This will also be the responsibility of the DoEA and will bring more coherence to renewable energy developments particularly at the national, grid-level, scale but also with some focus on the local, off-grid, scale.At the international level, Malawi is a signatory to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), which requires the government to report on greenhouse gas emissions and other vulnerabilities.  As part of their involvement with the UNFCCC, the Malawian Government developed a Technology Needs Assessment report in 2003 .  In the absence of other formally approved government policies, strategies or plans for renewable development, this document provides a reasonable overview of the government’s strategies and requirements with regards to renewables.In an attempt to minimize the use of biomass fuels the government undertook a number of initiatives including the Program for Biomass Energy Conservation (ProBEC) which seeks to promote the use of clay stoves to save fuel; the Promotion of Alternative Energy Sources Project (PAESP) which seeks to promote non-traditional fuels for cooking and heating to reduce environmental degradation; and a National Sustainable and Renewable Energy Programme (NSREP)  which promotes renewable energy technologies in Malawi. The Malawi Rural Electrification Project (MAREP) has also been established.The Rural Electrification Bill (2004) deals with all aspects of renewable energy systems. 

Source
Static Source:
  • Communicating Extreme Weather Event Attribution: Research from Kenya and India

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    Climate change attribution analysis assesses the likelihood that a particular extreme weather event has been made more or less likely as a result of anthropogenic climate change. Communication of extreme event attribution information in the immediate aftermath of an extreme event provides a window of opportunity to inform, educate, and affect a change in attitude or behaviour in order to mitigate or prepare for climate change.

  • Hydrological Zoning

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Sectors:

    Hydrological zoning (or simply zoning) is an approach to divide land into different zones based on their hydrological properties. Typically, each type of zone has different land use and development regulations linked to it. This land and water management method aims to protect local water sources from risks of over-abstraction, land salinization, groundwater pollution and waterlogging by managing land use activities based on the assigned hydrological zones.  For example, zones with a high groundwater table, large amounts of surface water (e.g.

  • Pöyry Austria GmbH

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Austria
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    Pöyry Austria GmbH, a member of the global Pöyry Group, is a consulting and engineering company with deep expertise with extensive local knowledge to deliver sustainable project investments. For instance, its Hydro Consulting department delivers services in the fields of hydrological and hydraulic modellingand forecasting. Its experts have significant experience in the fields of hydro-meteorology, climate change and climate sensitivity. They also contribute to assess climate risk and ctimate adaptation measures for hydropower and all other sectors of water management.

  • Energy Efficiency (Policies and Measures Database)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The Energy Efficiency Policies and Measures database provides information on policies and measures taken or planned to improve energy efficiency. The database further supports the IEA G8 Gleneagles Plan of Action mandate to “share best practice between participating governments”, and the agreement by IEA Energy Ministers in 2009 to promote energy efficiency and close policy gaps.

  • Green Resources & Energy Analysis Tool (GREAT)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The GREAT Tool for Cities is an integrated bottom-up, energy end-use based modelling and accounting tool for tracking energy consumption, production and resource extraction in all economic sectors on a city, provincial or regional level. The model uses the Long-range Energy Alternatives Planning System (LEAP) software developed by the Stockholm Environmental Institute and includes a national average dataset on energy input parameters for residential, commercial, transport, industry and agriculture end-use sectors.

  • Commercial Building Analysis Tool for Energy-Efficient Retrofits (COMBAT)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The Commercial Building Analysis Tool for Energy-Efficiency Retrofit (COMBAT) is created to facilitate policy makers, facility managers, and building retrofit practitioners to estimate commercial (public) buildings retrofit energy saving, cost and payback period. Common commercial building models area created, and the retrofit measures and their effects are pre-computed by EnergyPlus by taking different building types and measures interactions into account.

  • Local Energy Efficiency Policy Calculator (LEEP-C)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    The tool provides the opportunity to analyse the impacts of 23 different policy types from 4 energy-using sectors:

    1. public buildings,
    2. commercial buildings,
    3. residential buildings, and
    4. transportation.

    Impacts of policy choices are analysed in terms of energy savings, cost savings, pollution reduction, and other outcomes over a time period set by the user. The tool also allows for assigning the weights to different policy options based on community priorities in order to tailor policy development process to community goals.

  • Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Germany
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    The Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht-Zentrum für Material-und Küstenforschung GmbH (HZG) is one of 18 members of the Helmholtz Association of German Research Centres Germany's largest science organization. One of HZG's scientific organizational entities is the Climate Service Center Germany (GERICS), a think tank for innovations in the field of climate services.