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Madagascar

Official Name:
Republic of Madagascar

National Designated Entity

Type of organisation:
Name:
Mr. Michel Laivao
Phone:
+261 34 05 620 45
Emails:
laivao2002@yahoo.fr
,
Name:
Mr. Todisoa Manankasina
Phone:
+261 34 05 623 84
Emails:
t.manankasina@yahoo.fr
,
Name:
Mr. Germain Randriasandratana
Phone:
+261 34 05 624 03
Emails:
randriasandratana@yahoo.fr

Energy profile

Madagascar (2012)

Type: 
Energy profile
Energy profile
Extent of network

There are now three grids in the country; the Antananarivo Grid, the Toamasina Grid and the Fianarantsoa Grid. All equipment for transmission is administered by JIRAMA, the national utility. Whilst reliability and coverage of electricity have increased over the past 5 years, electricity generation only covers 15% of national needs, 72% in the urban areas and 5% in the rural areas. Production as a whole is unable to satisfy demand, so the rate of electrification is low, particularly in rural areas where less than 2% of the population have access to electricity.

Renewable energy potential

Solar energyThere is a favourable capacity for solar energy in the country, with an average horizontal insolation of 5.5 kWh/m2/day, across the majority of the land area. Photovoltaic’s (PV) in particular are currently utilised for powering public buildings such as health clinics, as well as an off-grid rural electrification solution.Wind energyConditions in the north and south have been identified as favourable to wind energy, exhibiting average wind speeds of 7.5 to 8.1 m/s at 80m. Other locations in the east and west have average wind speeds of 5.5 to 6.0 m/s at 80m. Wind power potential is currently being developed, as a technology for rural electrification, as well as on a larger scale, with independent power producer projects utilising the technology, and a 1.2 MW farm being constructed in the north of the island.Biomass energyBiomass in the south has been identified as having high potential for energy production. Sugar production is high, and bagasse co-generation is common. Currently, GEM Biofuels has a 137,000 acre plantation within the country dedicated to jatropha oil production. The first commercial shipment of oil was made in January, 2010.Geothermal energyadagascar is believed to have a geothermal potential which is estimated to be in excess of 350MW and it presents a huge number of medium and low enthalpy geothermal zones of interest. The exploration of geothermal energy in Madagascar is still at an early stage. In 2008, the country evaluated its low and medium enthalpy geothermal resources and the preliminary results from geology, geochemical data analyses and geophysical measurements indicate that medium temperature geothermal systems exist in the central and northern parts of the country and possibility of drilling into a medium temperature geothermal reservoir is high.HydropowerThe total hydro-electric potential of the country is estimated at 7,800 MW. However, only 150 MW of this is currently exploited, indicating the very high potential for further hydropower utilisation. Madagascar currently has 7 hydro-electric power plants, as well as 11 small-/micro-hydro plants.

Energy framework

In 2008, given the dependency on the oil imports and in the line of long term development of the country, the Government of Madagascar has set ambitious targets for extending electricity access under the Madagascar Action Plan (MAP). The MAP, which covers the period 2007-2012, is the medium term framework for achieving the country’s long term development aspirations as embodied in Madagascar Vision Naturally, as well as the long term targets in the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) or “Objectifs du Millénaire pour le Développement” (OMD). In the targets, the Government of Madagascar has planned to increase the electricity access rate to 74% in urban environment and 10% in rural environment by the year 2011. The energy supply will be derived from all possible sources of energy in Madagascar (solar, hydro, wind, bio).To reach those targets, the Government of Madagascar has elaborated the National Energy Strategy and Policy.The National Energy Policy contains statements on issues such as energy pricing and subsidies, energy sector governance and regulation, and the financing of energy sector investments. The policy also contains a separate policy statement on the electricity sub-sector, which confirms the policy commitment to enhancing access to electricity, particularly in rural areas.The National Energy Strategy sets out how the energy transition in Madagascar will be achieved given the macroeconomic impacts of consuming more petroleum products and electricity. The strategy highlights that the Government’s priorities to develop a knowledge-based economy and exploit indigenous energy resources will help to ensure that modern energy consumption is consistent with sustainable increases in national income levels.

Source
Static Source:
  • Communicating Extreme Weather Event Attribution: Research from Kenya and India

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    Climate change attribution analysis assesses the likelihood that a particular extreme weather event has been made more or less likely as a result of anthropogenic climate change. Communication of extreme event attribution information in the immediate aftermath of an extreme event provides a window of opportunity to inform, educate, and affect a change in attitude or behaviour in order to mitigate or prepare for climate change.

  • At établissement d’un centre de compétences sur les changements climatiques à Madagascar (4climate)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Sectors:
    Approach:

    Ce rapport comprend une cartographie exhaustive et une revue analytique des centres ou projets d’éducation sur les changements climatiques à l’échelle internationale afin d’alimenter la réflexion sur l’établissement du Centre 4Climate et de fonder les recommandations sur les meilleures pratiques internationales. Les centres sujets à la présente analyse sont : Centre de Compétences Changement Climatique Maroc (4C Maroc), Asian Disaster Preparedness Center (ADPC), KITE, et le Caribbean Community Climate Change Center (CCCCC).

  • Hydrological Zoning

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Sectors:

    Hydrological zoning (or simply zoning) is an approach to divide land into different zones based on their hydrological properties. Typically, each type of zone has different land use and development regulations linked to it. This land and water management method aims to protect local water sources from risks of over-abstraction, land salinization, groundwater pollution and waterlogging by managing land use activities based on the assigned hydrological zones.  For example, zones with a high groundwater table, large amounts of surface water (e.g.

  • Pöyry Austria GmbH

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Austria
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    Pöyry Austria GmbH, a member of the global Pöyry Group, is a consulting and engineering company with deep expertise with extensive local knowledge to deliver sustainable project investments. For instance, its Hydro Consulting department delivers services in the fields of hydrological and hydraulic modellingand forecasting. Its experts have significant experience in the fields of hydro-meteorology, climate change and climate sensitivity. They also contribute to assess climate risk and ctimate adaptation measures for hydropower and all other sectors of water management.

  • Energy Efficiency (Policies and Measures Database)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The Energy Efficiency Policies and Measures database provides information on policies and measures taken or planned to improve energy efficiency. The database further supports the IEA G8 Gleneagles Plan of Action mandate to “share best practice between participating governments”, and the agreement by IEA Energy Ministers in 2009 to promote energy efficiency and close policy gaps.

  • Green Resources & Energy Analysis Tool (GREAT)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The GREAT Tool for Cities is an integrated bottom-up, energy end-use based modelling and accounting tool for tracking energy consumption, production and resource extraction in all economic sectors on a city, provincial or regional level. The model uses the Long-range Energy Alternatives Planning System (LEAP) software developed by the Stockholm Environmental Institute and includes a national average dataset on energy input parameters for residential, commercial, transport, industry and agriculture end-use sectors.

  • Commercial Building Analysis Tool for Energy-Efficient Retrofits (COMBAT)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The Commercial Building Analysis Tool for Energy-Efficiency Retrofit (COMBAT) is created to facilitate policy makers, facility managers, and building retrofit practitioners to estimate commercial (public) buildings retrofit energy saving, cost and payback period. Common commercial building models area created, and the retrofit measures and their effects are pre-computed by EnergyPlus by taking different building types and measures interactions into account.

  • Local Energy Efficiency Policy Calculator (LEEP-C)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    The tool provides the opportunity to analyse the impacts of 23 different policy types from 4 energy-using sectors:

    1. public buildings,
    2. commercial buildings,
    3. residential buildings, and
    4. transportation.

    Impacts of policy choices are analysed in terms of energy savings, cost savings, pollution reduction, and other outcomes over a time period set by the user. The tool also allows for assigning the weights to different policy options based on community priorities in order to tailor policy development process to community goals.