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Kiribati

Official Name:
Republic of Kiribati
Region:

National Designated Entity

Type of organisation:
Government/Ministry
Name:
Ms. Maryanne Mikaere Namakim
Position:
Permanent Secretary
Phone:
+686 21183
Emails:
maryanne@ob.gov.ki

Energy profile

Kiribati (2012)

Type: 
Energy profile
Energy profile
Extent of network

On the outer islands, where 58% of the households reside, only 30% have access to electricity, mostly stand-alone solar PV home systems.On the capital, South Tarawa (Betio to Tanaea village), the access to grid extension is about 90% for the residential sector due mainly to the slow development of power utility to meet the growing electricity demand. However, the grid extension extends to the rural areas of North Tarawa, namely Buota, Abatao and Nabeina villages, with the grid access of around 50%.

Renewable energy potential

Biomass –coconut husks, shells and fuel wood— dominates energy use in the outer islands.  Copra remains a major cash generating product. The production in 2004 was 2700t of oil. If the coconut resource is rehabilitated, a major replanting programme will be necessary to replace senile trees.The level of solar energy is very good with estimates for some islands indicating over 6kWh/m2/day; solar water heating and solar PV are renewable energy technologies used, however producing less than 1% of total energy in Kiribati. Wind installations are particularly difficult for atoll islands due to their lack of significant elevation and the dominance of tall coconut trees over most land areas.There is significant OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion) resource in Kiribati but there have yet to be any successful commercial trials of OTEC systems and it appears very unlikely that OTEC will be economically or technically feasible on Kiribati in the near future.

Energy framework

In 2009, the new National Energy Policy was approved. While there was a pilot institutional woodstoves implemented by FSP under the Applied Geoscience and Technology Division of the Pacific Community (SOPAC) projects back in 1998, and the institutional woodstoves were installed one in the outer island Marakei and one in South Tarawa, the woodstoves had some structural cracks on the cement wall after a couple of years of use due to heating.The other household woodstove project was carried out by AMAK with the aim of transferring the technology and technical capacity through training locals from the outer islands in the construction and installation of household woodstoves. There had been no installation of woodstoves on the outer islands partly because there are abundant firewood, the conventional way of cooking using open fire is fast and an usual habit, and building woodstoves would require cost.The ‘Solar Energy for Outer Islands’ project, funded by the European Union, was finished early 2008. The program allowed for installation of 1,700 individual solar kits for 20% of the Gilbert Islands’ households, providing 4 hours/day of basic lighting (100Wp). Furthermore, 46 generators (300-600Wp) have been installed into Maneabas (local meeting houses). The project is implemented through the Kiribati Solar Energy Company.Kiribati is a member of SOPAC since 1979.Kiribati, as one of the world’s most vulnerable nations in terms of the effects of climate change, has been active in participating in international diplomatic efforts relating to climate change. The country ratified the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) on 7 February 1995 and the Kyoto Protocol on 7 September 2000. It is also a member of the Alliance of Small Island States (AOSIS) to address global warming. It has the climate change portal of the Office of the President of Kiribati (www.climate.gov.ki/), which demonstrates its strategies including mitigation, adaptation and relocation, though most of government departments do not have website.

Source
Static Source:
  • Communicating Extreme Weather Event Attribution: Research from Kenya and India

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    Climate change attribution analysis assesses the likelihood that a particular extreme weather event has been made more or less likely as a result of anthropogenic climate change. Communication of extreme event attribution information in the immediate aftermath of an extreme event provides a window of opportunity to inform, educate, and affect a change in attitude or behaviour in order to mitigate or prepare for climate change.

  • Hydrological Zoning

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Sectors:

    Hydrological zoning (or simply zoning) is an approach to divide land into different zones based on their hydrological properties. Typically, each type of zone has different land use and development regulations linked to it. This land and water management method aims to protect local water sources from risks of over-abstraction, land salinization, groundwater pollution and waterlogging by managing land use activities based on the assigned hydrological zones.  For example, zones with a high groundwater table, large amounts of surface water (e.g.

  • Energy Efficiency (Policies and Measures Database)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The Energy Efficiency Policies and Measures database provides information on policies and measures taken or planned to improve energy efficiency. The database further supports the IEA G8 Gleneagles Plan of Action mandate to “share best practice between participating governments”, and the agreement by IEA Energy Ministers in 2009 to promote energy efficiency and close policy gaps.

  • Green Resources & Energy Analysis Tool (GREAT)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The GREAT Tool for Cities is an integrated bottom-up, energy end-use based modelling and accounting tool for tracking energy consumption, production and resource extraction in all economic sectors on a city, provincial or regional level. The model uses the Long-range Energy Alternatives Planning System (LEAP) software developed by the Stockholm Environmental Institute and includes a national average dataset on energy input parameters for residential, commercial, transport, industry and agriculture end-use sectors.

  • Commercial Building Analysis Tool for Energy-Efficient Retrofits (COMBAT)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The Commercial Building Analysis Tool for Energy-Efficiency Retrofit (COMBAT) is created to facilitate policy makers, facility managers, and building retrofit practitioners to estimate commercial (public) buildings retrofit energy saving, cost and payback period. Common commercial building models area created, and the retrofit measures and their effects are pre-computed by EnergyPlus by taking different building types and measures interactions into account.

  • Local Energy Efficiency Policy Calculator (LEEP-C)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    The tool provides the opportunity to analyse the impacts of 23 different policy types from 4 energy-using sectors:

    1. public buildings,
    2. commercial buildings,
    3. residential buildings, and
    4. transportation.

    Impacts of policy choices are analysed in terms of energy savings, cost savings, pollution reduction, and other outcomes over a time period set by the user. The tool also allows for assigning the weights to different policy options based on community priorities in order to tailor policy development process to community goals.

  • Institut International de l'Écologie Industrielle et de l'Économie Verte

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Switzerland
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    The Institut International de l'Écologie Industrielle et de l'Économie Verte is an establishment of reflection, research and practice of industrial ecology. The Institute has an engineering division and an expertise cluster, which enables the Institute to identify new technologies linked to industrial ecology and to advise through a specific methodology adapted to local contexts. The project managers work on the practical execution of mandates and on the implementation of the industrial ecology with a particular attention to Switzerland and developing countries.

  • APEC Climate Center

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    South Korea
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    APCC is a organization that catalyzes climate information-based solutions through three interconnected pillars of work: climate prediction and information services; climate information application and climate change response; and capacity building. APC freely provides value-added, reliable, and timely climate prediction, while serving as a key climate information center to distribute climate data, prediction and related tools, in order to bridge technology gaps globally.