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Kyrgyzstan

Official Name:
Kyrgyz Republic
Region:

National Designated Entity

Type of organisation:
Government/Ministry
Name:
Mr. Kanat Abdrahmanov
Position:
Director
Phone:
+996 551 699000, +996 312 975774
Emails:
info@cfc.kg, kanat.adbrahmanov@gmail.com, adbrahmanov@cfc.kg
,

Energy profile

Kyrgyzstan (2012)

Type: 
Energy profile
Energy profile
Extent of network

Official household survey data indicate that, while nearly all households are nominal connected to the national electricity grid of the country, a sharp increase in the frequency of planned and unplanned service interruptions during 2008-2009 effectively broke the link between grid connections and reliable electricity supplied. Gas, central heating, and hot water supplies are typically unavailable to rural and many urban households.

Renewable energy potential

The total RES potential of Kyrgyzstan is around 590 Mio TOE/year, but with the exception of small-scale hydropower, it remains largely unused. Kyrgyzstan has good potential for the application of decentralized renewable energy technologies, primarily small hydropower stations on mountain rivers, solar and wind energy, and biogas plants. In comparison to big hydro and hydro-carbons, decentralized renewable projects are relatively inexpensive (in terms of up-front capital costs), and can attract at least some of the financing needed for their construction and maintenance from donors and the communities in which they are located. Despite this, according to one source, less than 1% of this potential is being utilized.HydroAccording to various estimates, Kyrgyzstan is not using more than 10% of its total hydropower capacity, which is assessed at 140 billion kWh by the “National Power Grid” company. The combination of abundant water resources and reliance on hydro power poses a dilemma for policy makers in Kyrgyzstan. The construction of new hydro power plants—both along the Naryn cascade and on smaller rivers—is an obvious way to increase capacity for winter power generation, as well as boost exports and promote economic development. The Ministry of Energy has conducted feasibility studies for constructing some 47 hydropower plants across the country.WindThe reported annual average wind speed ranges from 0.5 m/s to 3.6 m/s. The total wind potential is estimated at 1,500 MW. There has been minimal wind development activity in Kyrgyzstan.BiomassMore than 50% of agricultural lands are occupied by pastures that determined the main branch of agriculture – livestock breeding. The livestock waste, which could be used after processing in biogas plants, constitutes approximately 2,500 thousand tons per year. It is estimated that biogas plants could produce some 5 million tons of fertilizer and some 200 million cubic meters of gas in Kyrgyzstan annually. Currently, biogas facilities produce around 2 million cubic meters of biogas annually, which is used in the residential and commercial sector.SolarKyrgyzstan is rich in solar potential. The average annual output of solar energy is about 1,500 - 2,500 kWh per square meter; also, approximately 2,600 sunshine hours are recorded annually.GeothermalThe geothermal resources of Kyrgyz Republic include many thermal springs and high heat generating granites. It is believed that low to medium heat geothermal resources could be used for district heating. 

Energy framework

Kyrgyzstan’s National Energy Programme officially recognizes the importance of decentralized renewables; and a programme to develop small and medium-size power plants has been adopted. The law “On Renewable Energy” (of 31 December 2008) provides the over-arching legal framework, which regulates the development and use of decentralized renewable energy technologies. It calls for mechanisms to stimulate the development of these technologies, and to support producers and consumers of decentralized renewables. In particular, the government is to support tariff-setting so as to guarantee an eight-year payback period for decentralized renewable projects. However, while this law created the legal framework for decentralized renewables, the practical framework for its implementation has yet to be fully introduced.In May 2003, the Kyrgyz Republic ratified the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (Clean Development Mechanism) in May 2003.The National Energy Program of Kyrgyzstan (though 2010) and the Strategy for the Fuel and Energy Complex Development (though 2025) call for the rapid expansion of renewables by building around 100 small hydroelectric plants with a total capacity of approximately 180 MW.Legislation on RE and specifically small hydropower stations has been fairly successful in Kyrgyzstan. To promote public awareness of renewable energy, booklets describing the benefits of small hydropower stations as well as how to install a small hydropower plant were distributed to rural communities. Also, a revolving credit facility was established in Karakol by the “Issyk-Kul Activist” NGO in order to help farmers finance small hydropower plants for their operations or residences. As a result of this legislation, two pilot projects (5 kW each) have been launched by local companies.The government’s programme to develop small and medium-size power plants calls for the construction and reconstruction of 43 small and medium-sized facilities (primarily small hydropower plants, in mostly the 2-3 MW installed capacity range) with total installed capacity of 277 MW. It also calls for the construction of a wind power plant near Balykchi with a rated capacity of 22 MW. 

Source
Static Source:
  • Communicating Extreme Weather Event Attribution: Research from Kenya and India

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    Climate change attribution analysis assesses the likelihood that a particular extreme weather event has been made more or less likely as a result of anthropogenic climate change. Communication of extreme event attribution information in the immediate aftermath of an extreme event provides a window of opportunity to inform, educate, and affect a change in attitude or behaviour in order to mitigate or prepare for climate change.

  • Hydrological Zoning

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Sectors:

    Hydrological zoning (or simply zoning) is an approach to divide land into different zones based on their hydrological properties. Typically, each type of zone has different land use and development regulations linked to it. This land and water management method aims to protect local water sources from risks of over-abstraction, land salinization, groundwater pollution and waterlogging by managing land use activities based on the assigned hydrological zones.  For example, zones with a high groundwater table, large amounts of surface water (e.g.

  • Pöyry Austria GmbH

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Austria
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    Pöyry Austria GmbH, a member of the global Pöyry Group, is a consulting and engineering company with deep expertise with extensive local knowledge to deliver sustainable project investments. For instance, its Hydro Consulting department delivers services in the fields of hydrological and hydraulic modellingand forecasting. Its experts have significant experience in the fields of hydro-meteorology, climate change and climate sensitivity. They also contribute to assess climate risk and ctimate adaptation measures for hydropower and all other sectors of water management.

  • GWCC INTERIVAL ZT GmbH

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Austria
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    GWCC INTERIVAL ZT GmbH (GWCC) is a consulting company based in Vienna (part of the Austrian Consulting Group ROHRHOFER & Partner). GWCC has a long experience (since 1984) in the fields of Infrastructure Development, Management, Institutional Strengthening in the field of Water, Waste Water and Waste Management in Austria, CEE,CIS, FUS countries. Climate related projects are mainly conducted in various regions of Austria,e.g.flood risk mapping & planning of flood mitigation measures.  

  • Tambourine Innovation Ventures Inc.

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    United States
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    Incorporated in 2015, Tambourine Innovation Ventures (TIV) is an innovation advisory and venture development firm that provides a full suite of services and solutions to the challenges and needs generated by the increasing interest and activity globally in the areas of climate change adaptation/mitigation, innovation, technology transfer and venture finance. TIV founders and consultants bring more than three decades of experience in assisting the developing countries access innovative technologies from the industrialized countries and grow technology ventures.

  • Energy Efficiency (Policies and Measures Database)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The Energy Efficiency Policies and Measures database provides information on policies and measures taken or planned to improve energy efficiency. The database further supports the IEA G8 Gleneagles Plan of Action mandate to “share best practice between participating governments”, and the agreement by IEA Energy Ministers in 2009 to promote energy efficiency and close policy gaps.

  • Green Resources & Energy Analysis Tool (GREAT)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The GREAT Tool for Cities is an integrated bottom-up, energy end-use based modelling and accounting tool for tracking energy consumption, production and resource extraction in all economic sectors on a city, provincial or regional level. The model uses the Long-range Energy Alternatives Planning System (LEAP) software developed by the Stockholm Environmental Institute and includes a national average dataset on energy input parameters for residential, commercial, transport, industry and agriculture end-use sectors.

  • Commercial Building Analysis Tool for Energy-Efficient Retrofits (COMBAT)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The Commercial Building Analysis Tool for Energy-Efficiency Retrofit (COMBAT) is created to facilitate policy makers, facility managers, and building retrofit practitioners to estimate commercial (public) buildings retrofit energy saving, cost and payback period. Common commercial building models area created, and the retrofit measures and their effects are pre-computed by EnergyPlus by taking different building types and measures interactions into account.