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Honduras

Official Name:
Republic of Honduras

National Designated Entity

Type of organisation:
Government/Ministry
Name:
Mr. Roberto Aparicio
Position:
Tecnico de Mitigacion de la Direccion Nacional de Cambio Climatico de esta Secretaria de Estado
Phone:
+504 2235 9200
Emails:
aparicioproyectos@yahoo.com, cooperacionserna@gmail.com, despachomiambientehn@gmail.com

Energy profile

Honduras (2012)

Type: 
Energy profile
Energy profile
Extent of network

National electrification rate (2010): 81.3%Urban rate: 95%Rural rate: 45%.The Electricity Coverage Index by department shows great disparities. Cortes and Islas de Bahia enjoy almost a 100% household coverage, while Lempira and Intibuca only have 24.6% and 36.2% coverage respectively. Electrification was programmed under the 1994 Electricity Law for the Electricity Sector through the creation of the Social Fund for Electricity Development (FOSODE). The Government has set a target to increase national electricity coverage to 80% by 2015, giving equal priority to urban and rural. So far, the outcome has been positive, with an increase in national coverage from 43% in 1994 to 69% in 2006. 400,000 new connections are expected to be made by 2015. However, lack of financing has slowed grid development, causing it to lag behind demand.

Renewable energy potential

There is great potential of untapped indigenous renewable energy resources. Due to the likely long-term trend of high oil prices, such resources could be developed at competitive prices. However, except for the large hydro projects, the potential for the development of renewable energy - hydro, wind, solar, biomass and geothermal - is yet to be explored.Two build–operate–transfer (BOT) schemes for medium hydro projects are being developed in Honduras. In 2006, a Brazilian construction firm expressed interest in building Janito and Jicatuyo projects on the Ullúa river, in the West. It is estimated that both projects will add a total of 271 MW. As of 2009 pre-feasibility studies are being conducted. Financing from the Central American Investment Bank has already been requested. The Brazilian government has provided technical support. The projects include transmission and distribution investments. Ownership of the facility will be transferred to the state after 25 years. The second BOT involves the government of Taiwan in building and operating Patuca 3 project, expected to add 100 MW. Ownership of the facility will be transferred to the state after 30 years.In January, 2011, the Congress approved the Decree for the construction of hydroelectric dams Patuca I, Patuca II and Patuca III, Olancho, and Los Llanitos and Jicatuyo in Santa Barbara, with the aim to generate 1000 MW of energy.It is expected that in three years Patuca III (or Piedras Amarillas), is generating the first 104 MW of power. The construction of Patuca II (or Valencia) and Patuca III (or La Torrosa) are scheduled for later. Besides the five dams approved by the Decree, the construction of the Energy Complex of the Aguán Valley (hydropower, biomass and solar) located in the department of Yoro has been aproved, under the coordination of the Empresa Nacional de Energía Eléctrica (ENEE).In November 2007, the Law for Biofuels production and consumption was approved. In November 2008 its Decree which was published in February 2009.BiomassThe Sistema Interconectado Nacional currently has 60 MW of total installed capacity with biomass resources contributed by private developers. It is contemplated an additional 125 MW in the future.GeothermalThere is a pioneering initiative called Platanares Geothermal which has been developing actions at the level of study and so far it is believed it will produce about 35 MW in the Platanares community. It is expected that the geothermal project will be in operation in 2013. There is an estimated geothermal potential of 125.3 MW in Honduras.

Energy framework

Decree 9-2001 on Wind Energy Private Pilot Projects. Decree 267 for the Promotion of Projects Based on Renewable and Sustainable Resources.Framework Law of the Energy Sector 158-94 of 1994. Legal Framework and Reforms of the Energy Sector Law and Incentives Law for Renewable Energy Generation of 1998 which provides incentives to the development and generation of energy by means of new and renewable sources. Decrees No. 85-98 and 267-98 promote the development of renewable energy-generating plants. The decrees include tax breaks to developers and a secure buyer for energy at prices equivalent to the system’s short-term marginal cost. The national integrated utility ENEE, which is the default buyer, must pay a premium (10% of the same short-run marginal costs) for the electricity generated when the installed capacity is below 50 MW.  This framework has facilitated the negotiation of about 30 public/private partnerships with ENEE for small renewable energy plants. In addition, Decree No. 85-98 also establishes tax exemptions in favour of developers: import and sales’ taxes on equipment, and a five-year income tax holiday.In 2007 a Law promoting Electricity Generation with Renewable Resources was approved. The approval of its Decree is in process.

Source
Static Source:
  • Communicating Extreme Weather Event Attribution: Research from Kenya and India

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    Climate change attribution analysis assesses the likelihood that a particular extreme weather event has been made more or less likely as a result of anthropogenic climate change. Communication of extreme event attribution information in the immediate aftermath of an extreme event provides a window of opportunity to inform, educate, and affect a change in attitude or behaviour in order to mitigate or prepare for climate change.

  • Hydrological Zoning

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Sectors:

    Hydrological zoning (or simply zoning) is an approach to divide land into different zones based on their hydrological properties. Typically, each type of zone has different land use and development regulations linked to it. This land and water management method aims to protect local water sources from risks of over-abstraction, land salinization, groundwater pollution and waterlogging by managing land use activities based on the assigned hydrological zones.  For example, zones with a high groundwater table, large amounts of surface water (e.g.

  • Tambourine Innovation Ventures Inc.

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    United States
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    Incorporated in 2015, Tambourine Innovation Ventures (TIV) is an innovation advisory and venture development firm that provides a full suite of services and solutions to the challenges and needs generated by the increasing interest and activity globally in the areas of climate change adaptation/mitigation, innovation, technology transfer and venture finance. TIV founders and consultants bring more than three decades of experience in assisting the developing countries access innovative technologies from the industrialized countries and grow technology ventures.

  • Sud Austral Consulting SpA

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Chile
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    Sud-Austral Consulting S.p.A.is a consulting company created through individual and collective experience of its members, after recurring mutual collaboration for several years it was consolidated in early 2012 in the creation of a consulting entity formally established. The experience of professionals and technicians of Sud-Austral Consulting S.p.A.has resulted in consulting services in projects developed by governments, public and private institutions, both in Chile, South and Central America.

  • Energy Efficiency (Policies and Measures Database)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The Energy Efficiency Policies and Measures database provides information on policies and measures taken or planned to improve energy efficiency. The database further supports the IEA G8 Gleneagles Plan of Action mandate to “share best practice between participating governments”, and the agreement by IEA Energy Ministers in 2009 to promote energy efficiency and close policy gaps.

  • Green Resources & Energy Analysis Tool (GREAT)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The GREAT Tool for Cities is an integrated bottom-up, energy end-use based modelling and accounting tool for tracking energy consumption, production and resource extraction in all economic sectors on a city, provincial or regional level. The model uses the Long-range Energy Alternatives Planning System (LEAP) software developed by the Stockholm Environmental Institute and includes a national average dataset on energy input parameters for residential, commercial, transport, industry and agriculture end-use sectors.

  • Commercial Building Analysis Tool for Energy-Efficient Retrofits (COMBAT)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The Commercial Building Analysis Tool for Energy-Efficiency Retrofit (COMBAT) is created to facilitate policy makers, facility managers, and building retrofit practitioners to estimate commercial (public) buildings retrofit energy saving, cost and payback period. Common commercial building models area created, and the retrofit measures and their effects are pre-computed by EnergyPlus by taking different building types and measures interactions into account.

  • Local Energy Efficiency Policy Calculator (LEEP-C)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    The tool provides the opportunity to analyse the impacts of 23 different policy types from 4 energy-using sectors:

    1. public buildings,
    2. commercial buildings,
    3. residential buildings, and
    4. transportation.

    Impacts of policy choices are analysed in terms of energy savings, cost savings, pollution reduction, and other outcomes over a time period set by the user. The tool also allows for assigning the weights to different policy options based on community priorities in order to tailor policy development process to community goals.