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Grenada

Official Name:
Grenada
Region:

National Designated Entity

Type of organisation:
Government/Ministry
Name:
Ms. Merina Jessamy
Position:
Permanent Secretary, Climate Resilience, the Environment, Forestry, Fisheries, Disaster Management and Information
Phone:
+473 440 3386 ext 26862
Emails:
mejessamy@gmail.com, merinaeduards@hotmail.com

Energy profile

Grenada (2012)

Type: 
Energy profile
Energy profile
Extent of network

National electrification rate (2008): 99.5%.

Renewable energy potential

Grenada has promoted capitalization of its natural resources by using renewables such as wind and solar energy, which according to 2006 OLADE data reached 588 thousand barrels of oil equivalent. Solar, wind and biomass are the main potential sources of renewable energy.Hydropower Possible hydropower potentials were studied in the 1980s but nothing beyond 500 kW was discovered.Solar energySolar energy is mainly used for water heaters in hospitals and residences. Since 2006, the private Grenada Solar Power GRENSOL has been marketing photovoltaic systems –with ratings up to 9 kW- and more recently entered into an agreement with GRENLEC to inject power from systems with ratings up to 20 kW into the local grid in a net-metering arrangement.Wind energyWind energy studies were conducted in the three islands of Grenada with the identification of three areas. There is an 80-kW wind power facility that became operational in March 2007 on the premises of a holiday resort in the southeast of the country.Biomass energyFire wood is used for cooking in residential and rural areas. Bagasse is used as fuel by the sugarcane industry. The yearly sugarcane bagasse production was 3800 barrels of oil equivalent. In addition, wastes from nutmeg processing have been turned into energy potential, and over the coming decade may be used as fuel in steam turbine generation plants.GeothermalGrenada’s geothermal potential is estimated at 400 MW.GRENLEC has recently indicated its interest in geothermal energy development and has submitted a proposed development strategy to the government. GRENLEC has suggested that a possible scenario would be the installation of a 20 MW geothermal plant to be operational by the last quarter of 2013, with a longer term plan to increase geothermal capacity to 40+ MW. This is a positive development that aligns with Government’s policy. The company’s capacity projections to 2015, short and long term business plans, future Annual Reports and the company’s formal documentation must now be made to reflect this stated intention if it is to be regarded and accepted by the wider public as part of GRENLEC’s intended business approach. It is also expected that GRENLEC will indicate where its priorities in renewable energy investments will be placed.Waste-to-EnergyThere is significant interest in Waste-to-Energy as an option in Grenada. GRENLEC has stated its interest in developing municipal solid waste as an alternative energy source and have conducted an analysis of the waste stream and content to inform their plans. Accordingly, their capacity projections show an addition of 1.5 MW of municipal Waste-to-Energy capacity in 2013.According to the National Energy Policy, in order to make the transition to renewable energy for domestic demand, the Government of Grenada will:- Complete Feasibility and Construct a 20 MW Geothermal Plant- Construct an Additional 20 MW Geothermal Plant- Construct a 2.5 MW Wind Turbine for Carriacou- Achieve 10% Electricity Generation by Wind & Solar PV- Establish Vehicle Fuel Efficiency Standards- Achieve 20% Market Penetration with Hybrid and Electric Vehicles

Energy framework

In 2011, the Cabinet of Grenada approved the official National Energy Policy (NEP). The formulation of the NEP started in 2009 through the technical and financial support of the OAS-EU financed project Caribbean Sustainable Energy Program (CSEP) with assistance of the Isada Consulting Group.The NEP represents a collaboration of many stakeholders in Grenada led by the Ministry of Finance, Planning, Economy, Energy and Cooperatives with input from the public at large.The Grenada National Energy Policy is the guideline and roadmap to the development of a healthy Energy Mix in Grenada and hence a step forward in resolving energy poverty which critically acts as a barrier to the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).20% of all domestic energy usage (electricity and transport) will originate from renewable energy sources by 2020.

Source
Static Source:
  • Communicating Extreme Weather Event Attribution: Research from Kenya and India

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    Climate change attribution analysis assesses the likelihood that a particular extreme weather event has been made more or less likely as a result of anthropogenic climate change. Communication of extreme event attribution information in the immediate aftermath of an extreme event provides a window of opportunity to inform, educate, and affect a change in attitude or behaviour in order to mitigate or prepare for climate change.

  • Hydrological Zoning

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Sectors:

    Hydrological zoning (or simply zoning) is an approach to divide land into different zones based on their hydrological properties. Typically, each type of zone has different land use and development regulations linked to it. This land and water management method aims to protect local water sources from risks of over-abstraction, land salinization, groundwater pollution and waterlogging by managing land use activities based on the assigned hydrological zones.  For example, zones with a high groundwater table, large amounts of surface water (e.g.

  • Energy Efficiency (Policies and Measures Database)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The Energy Efficiency Policies and Measures database provides information on policies and measures taken or planned to improve energy efficiency. The database further supports the IEA G8 Gleneagles Plan of Action mandate to “share best practice between participating governments”, and the agreement by IEA Energy Ministers in 2009 to promote energy efficiency and close policy gaps.

  • Green Resources & Energy Analysis Tool (GREAT)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The GREAT Tool for Cities is an integrated bottom-up, energy end-use based modelling and accounting tool for tracking energy consumption, production and resource extraction in all economic sectors on a city, provincial or regional level. The model uses the Long-range Energy Alternatives Planning System (LEAP) software developed by the Stockholm Environmental Institute and includes a national average dataset on energy input parameters for residential, commercial, transport, industry and agriculture end-use sectors.

  • Commercial Building Analysis Tool for Energy-Efficient Retrofits (COMBAT)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The Commercial Building Analysis Tool for Energy-Efficiency Retrofit (COMBAT) is created to facilitate policy makers, facility managers, and building retrofit practitioners to estimate commercial (public) buildings retrofit energy saving, cost and payback period. Common commercial building models area created, and the retrofit measures and their effects are pre-computed by EnergyPlus by taking different building types and measures interactions into account.

  • Local Energy Efficiency Policy Calculator (LEEP-C)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    The tool provides the opportunity to analyse the impacts of 23 different policy types from 4 energy-using sectors:

    1. public buildings,
    2. commercial buildings,
    3. residential buildings, and
    4. transportation.

    Impacts of policy choices are analysed in terms of energy savings, cost savings, pollution reduction, and other outcomes over a time period set by the user. The tool also allows for assigning the weights to different policy options based on community priorities in order to tailor policy development process to community goals.

  • Institut International de l'Écologie Industrielle et de l'Économie Verte

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Switzerland
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    The Institut International de l'Écologie Industrielle et de l'Économie Verte is an establishment of reflection, research and practice of industrial ecology. The Institute has an engineering division and an expertise cluster, which enables the Institute to identify new technologies linked to industrial ecology and to advise through a specific methodology adapted to local contexts. The project managers work on the practical execution of mandates and on the implementation of the industrial ecology with a particular attention to Switzerland and developing countries.

  • Centro GlobalCAD 3.0 SL

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Spain
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    GlobalCAD is formed by a group of international experts specialized in fields related to human and sustainable development. They provide technical and strategic advice, research and capacity building to international organizations, governments, NGOs and private sector organizations worldwide.