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Algeria

Official Name:
People’s Democratic Republic of Algeria

National Designated Entity

Type of organisation:
Specialized agency
Name:
Mr. Noureddine Yassaa
Position:
Director
Phone:
+21 321901561
Emails:
n.yassaa@cder.dz
,
Name:
Mr. Samy Bouchaib
Position:
Head of Department
Phone:
+21 321900641
Emails:
s.bouchaib@cder.dz

Energy profile

Algeria (2012)

Type: 
Energy profile
Energy profile
Extent of network

The vast majority of the Algerian territory is a desert land with very few inhabitants and harsh conditions, but simultaneously abundant solar energy resources. It is estimated that an area of 1 million km2 has not been electrified yet and is technically very difficult, if not impossible, to be electrified by traditional means of extending transmission networks. It should be noted that there are areas that form autonomous power systems within Algeria.Algeria has over 140,000 miles of power lines, serving almost the entire population, over 98%. There are plans to increase the size of the network by 5% in coming years in order to reach isolated rural communities and hydrocarbon developments in the Sahara Desert.

Renewable energy potential

The geographic location of Algeria means it has the potential to  play an important strategic role in the implementation of renewable energy technology in the north of Africa, providing sufficient energy for its own needs and even exporting it to countries as far as Europe. A report by the International Energy Agency’s (IEA) suggests countries such as Algeria could one day  export solar energy to markets in Europe, as it becomes connected to European energy networks. The report also says that within 20 years solar power could provide the same amount of electricity as 72 coal-fired power stations. This is enough to supply 100 million people, or the combined populations of Algeria, Morocco, Tunisia and Libya.Solar energyThe Algerian Ministry of Energy and Mines (MEM) states that “the biggest potential in Algeria is for solar”, with data from the World Energy Council confirming the Sahara region to have the most potential. Annual average insolation is 2,000 hours with the high plateaus receiving about 3,900 hours.  This gives an average solar energy of 6.57 kWh/m2/day.The development of solar energy plants is supported by the MEM and realised mainly by Sonelgaz and other private installer companies. The solar energy is regarded as an important line of research within the structure of the department of renewable energies of Sonelgaz.Wind energyWind energy is feasible where the average wind velocity is higher than 5–6 m/s. Algeria has  substantial plans to develop their wind energy potential. Studies of indigenous wind resources in Algeria, performed in recent years by the Algerian Centre for Renewable Energy Development (CDER, http://www.cder.dz/) , show that the climatic conditions in Algeria are favourable for wind energy utilisation. The wind map established by the MEM shows that 50% of the country’s surface receives a high average wind speed. The best wind energy potential is in the South, especially in the South-Western region where the wind velocity is higher than 6m/s.The wind resource has also been assessed by the developer, Sonelgaz, and at present, there are six pilot projects for electrification and telecommunication which are identified and quantified. These are Adrar, Tindouf, bordj Badji Mokhtar, Bechar, Tamanrassat and Djanet. The installation, by Sonelgaz, of nine assessment stations in different regions of Algeria is the next step in accelerating the use of wind power.Biomass energyThe biomass potentially offers great promise, with 3.7 Mtoe coming from forests and 1.33 Mtoe per year coming from agricultural and urban wastes (approximately 365 kg of urban waste per Algerian); however this potential is not enhanced and consumed yet. A preliminary survey showed the feasibility of production of electricity by modals of 2MW, that can reach a peak of 6MW, from the discharge of Oued Smar in Algiers. The study integrates the drainage of the site.Geothermal energyGeothermic energy hot springs are numerous but not yet exploited for industrial ends. More than 200 geothermal sources were counted and recorded by CDER, one third of which have temperatures superior to 45˚C. The highest temperatures registered were 98˚C and 118˚C in Hamam El Maskhoutin and Biskra, respectively, situated in the western part of the country. In terms of power production, geothermal potential is in range of 700 MW.HydropowerRestricted rainfall, high levels of evaporation and quick evacuation to the sea are barriers to the uptake of hydropower. However, 103 dam sites have been recorded, primarily in the North. More than 50 dams are currently operational and the combined capacity of the largest 13 dams is roughly 269 MW.

Energy framework

The major text of the legislative purview concerning electricity production from renewable sources is the law 02-01 dated 5th February 2002, and relates to electricity and the distribution of gas through pipelines. This law fixed the legislative framework for electricity production in order to reform the Algerian electric system. These provisions apply to all the branches of production, including electricity from renewable sources. The quantities of energy to be sold  on the market and the encouragement of the renewable sources, or cogeneration, should be subject to a call for tenders defined through statutory channels. This system would benefit renewable electricity production. This special system is clarified in the draft executive decree relative to the costs of diversification of the electricity production, which was adopted by the Council of government in January 2004.The market of renewable energy is very small. Currently the market of electricity that is largely defined by the Law on Electricity and Distribution of Gas No. 02-01.  Having ambitious quantitative targets, the Algerian’s environmental friendly energy strategy has set up solar and wind projects generating 575MW by 2015, 1400MW by 2020 and 7500MW around 2030, though the trends are positive.One of the renewable energy development objectives made by the Ministry of Energy and Mines (MEM) is to supply the isolated zones, which are far from the gas distribution networks (electricity and oil products), with energy services. Another objective is to contribute to the preservation of hydrocarbon reserves by the exploitation of the renewable energy resources, particularly solar power. The large exploitation of the solar field with the aim of producing electricity connected to the framework will contribute to satisfying national energy needs and will eventually be exported to European countries. This prospect fits with a sustainable development process which contributes to the preservation of the environment. Programmes have included different solar applications: rural electrification, photovoltaic pumping, water heating and other industrial applications. Algeria is committed to its National Rural Electrification Programme, which continues to provide solar power to villages in southern Algeria, following a successful first phase; the second phase is now underway.

Source
Static Source:
  • Communicating Extreme Weather Event Attribution: Research from Kenya and India

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    Climate change attribution analysis assesses the likelihood that a particular extreme weather event has been made more or less likely as a result of anthropogenic climate change. Communication of extreme event attribution information in the immediate aftermath of an extreme event provides a window of opportunity to inform, educate, and affect a change in attitude or behaviour in order to mitigate or prepare for climate change.

  • Hydrological Zoning

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Sectors:

    Hydrological zoning (or simply zoning) is an approach to divide land into different zones based on their hydrological properties. Typically, each type of zone has different land use and development regulations linked to it. This land and water management method aims to protect local water sources from risks of over-abstraction, land salinization, groundwater pollution and waterlogging by managing land use activities based on the assigned hydrological zones.  For example, zones with a high groundwater table, large amounts of surface water (e.g.

  • Pöyry Austria GmbH

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Austria
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    Pöyry Austria GmbH, a member of the global Pöyry Group, is a consulting and engineering company with deep expertise with extensive local knowledge to deliver sustainable project investments. For instance, its Hydro Consulting department delivers services in the fields of hydrological and hydraulic modellingand forecasting. Its experts have significant experience in the fields of hydro-meteorology, climate change and climate sensitivity. They also contribute to assess climate risk and ctimate adaptation measures for hydropower and all other sectors of water management.

  • Energy Efficiency (Policies and Measures Database)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The Energy Efficiency Policies and Measures database provides information on policies and measures taken or planned to improve energy efficiency. The database further supports the IEA G8 Gleneagles Plan of Action mandate to “share best practice between participating governments”, and the agreement by IEA Energy Ministers in 2009 to promote energy efficiency and close policy gaps.

  • Green Resources & Energy Analysis Tool (GREAT)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The GREAT Tool for Cities is an integrated bottom-up, energy end-use based modelling and accounting tool for tracking energy consumption, production and resource extraction in all economic sectors on a city, provincial or regional level. The model uses the Long-range Energy Alternatives Planning System (LEAP) software developed by the Stockholm Environmental Institute and includes a national average dataset on energy input parameters for residential, commercial, transport, industry and agriculture end-use sectors.

  • Commercial Building Analysis Tool for Energy-Efficient Retrofits (COMBAT)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The Commercial Building Analysis Tool for Energy-Efficiency Retrofit (COMBAT) is created to facilitate policy makers, facility managers, and building retrofit practitioners to estimate commercial (public) buildings retrofit energy saving, cost and payback period. Common commercial building models area created, and the retrofit measures and their effects are pre-computed by EnergyPlus by taking different building types and measures interactions into account.

  • Local Energy Efficiency Policy Calculator (LEEP-C)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    The tool provides the opportunity to analyse the impacts of 23 different policy types from 4 energy-using sectors:

    1. public buildings,
    2. commercial buildings,
    3. residential buildings, and
    4. transportation.

    Impacts of policy choices are analysed in terms of energy savings, cost savings, pollution reduction, and other outcomes over a time period set by the user. The tool also allows for assigning the weights to different policy options based on community priorities in order to tailor policy development process to community goals.

  • Institut International de l'Écologie Industrielle et de l'Économie Verte

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Switzerland
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    The Institut International de l'Écologie Industrielle et de l'Économie Verte is an establishment of reflection, research and practice of industrial ecology. The Institute has an engineering division and an expertise cluster, which enables the Institute to identify new technologies linked to industrial ecology and to advise through a specific methodology adapted to local contexts. The project managers work on the practical execution of mandates and on the implementation of the industrial ecology with a particular attention to Switzerland and developing countries.