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Cameroon

Official Name:
Republic of Cameroon

National Designated Entity

Type of organisation:
Government/Ministry
Name:
Mr. Forghab Patrick Mbomba
Position:
Deputy Managing Director
Phone:
+237 677 615 343, +237 697 117 393, +237 222 209 504
Emails:
forghabp@yahoo.com,

Energy profile

Cameroon (2012)

Type: 
Energy profile
Energy profile
Extent of network

Access to power has steadily improved in Cameroon. National access to electricity increased from 37% in 1996 to 46% in 2002, and to 48% in 2007, above the average for Africa’s resource-rich countries. Estimates of urban access suggest that between 65% and 88% of the urban population has access to electricity. At 88%, access to power in urban areas is greater than in most low-, middle-, and resource-rich countries in Africa. But these positive trends do not extend to rural areas: only about 14% of rural dwellers benefit from access to electricity, half the level incomparable countries.Electricity supply is unevenly distributed owing to the discontinuity of the national grid, which prevents the transfer of power among the three separate grids: the Northern Interconnected Grid (NIG), the Eastern Isolated Grid (EIG) and the Southern Interconnected Grid (SIG).

Renewable energy potential

Solar energy Some important solar energy resources are available throughout the country. In the most suitable parts, the average solar irradiance is estimated at 5.8 kWh/day/ m2, while the rest of the country commonly sees 4.9kWh/day/ m2 .  Solar power is currently used in distributed generation systems, particularly for powering the cellular telecommunications network. However, only approximately 50 PV installations currently exist.Wind energy Other renewable energy resources such as wind energy exist in the north of Cameroon and the littoral region. However, the wind speeds as reported by meteorological services are not sufficient for the development of wind energy projects.Biomass energy Cameroon also has the third largest biomass potential in sub-Saharan Africa, with 25 million hectares of forest covering three-quarters of its territory. However, the unsustainable use of this resource has led to significant deforestation throughout the country, with an annual clearance rate of 200,000 hectares/yr and regeneration of only 3,000 hectares/yr. Primary uses for biomass in the country include heating and light for the majority of the rural population.Utilisation of palm oil for biodiesel is also a viable prospect for the country. At present, around 108,000 hectares of land are affected by oil palm growing. However between 2001 and 2006 a total of 30,000 hectares of forest were cleared to allow for the expansion palm oil crop.Geothermal energyHot springs are found in extensive areas: Ngaoundéré region, Mt Cameroon region and Manengoumba area with Lake Moundou. However this potential not been seriously examined.Hydropower Cameroon has the second largest hydroelectric potential in sub-Saharan Africa. Total potential is estimated at 23 GW, with a production potential of 103 TWh per year. There are three main facilities in the country: EDEA (263 MW); Songloulou (388 MW) and Lagdo (72 MW).The potential for small Hydro Power installations (up to 1 MW) is estimated at 1.115 TWh, mainly in the eastern and western regions of Cameroon, however this potential is yet to be properly exploited.

Energy framework

The government’s policy seeks to get the country out of under-development, through the implementation of the long-term Energy Sector Development Plan (PDSE 2030) and the Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP). The energy sector is now being considered as a factor for attracting investment and strengthening growth, particularly as Cameroon’s hydroelectric potential ranks second-highest in Central Africa, after that of the Democratic Republic of the Congo.Moreover, Cameroon’s development objectives under the Vision 2035 envisage significant investments in the energy sector, with the inclusion of renewables.  The policy goals of the government are to ensure energy independence through increased production and delivery of electricity, of oil and gas (petroleum resources) and to ensure their contribution to economic development. With regard to rural areas  Cameroon’s Rural Electrification Master Plan (PDER)concerns the electrification of about 660 localities through the extension of the interconnected grids, the rehabilitation and construction of isolated diesel power plants and mini-hydro plants as well as the development of a regional grid. By 2020, the Government aims to achieve a 48% countrywide electrification rate, a 75% electricity access rate and a 20% rural electrification rate. This project will contribute to the achievement of these objectives.

Source
Static Source:
  • Communicating Extreme Weather Event Attribution: Research from Kenya and India

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    Climate change attribution analysis assesses the likelihood that a particular extreme weather event has been made more or less likely as a result of anthropogenic climate change. Communication of extreme event attribution information in the immediate aftermath of an extreme event provides a window of opportunity to inform, educate, and affect a change in attitude or behaviour in order to mitigate or prepare for climate change.

  • Hydrological Zoning

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Sectors:

    Hydrological zoning (or simply zoning) is an approach to divide land into different zones based on their hydrological properties. Typically, each type of zone has different land use and development regulations linked to it. This land and water management method aims to protect local water sources from risks of over-abstraction, land salinization, groundwater pollution and waterlogging by managing land use activities based on the assigned hydrological zones.  For example, zones with a high groundwater table, large amounts of surface water (e.g.

  • Energy Efficiency (Policies and Measures Database)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The Energy Efficiency Policies and Measures database provides information on policies and measures taken or planned to improve energy efficiency. The database further supports the IEA G8 Gleneagles Plan of Action mandate to “share best practice between participating governments”, and the agreement by IEA Energy Ministers in 2009 to promote energy efficiency and close policy gaps.

  • Green Resources & Energy Analysis Tool (GREAT)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The GREAT Tool for Cities is an integrated bottom-up, energy end-use based modelling and accounting tool for tracking energy consumption, production and resource extraction in all economic sectors on a city, provincial or regional level. The model uses the Long-range Energy Alternatives Planning System (LEAP) software developed by the Stockholm Environmental Institute and includes a national average dataset on energy input parameters for residential, commercial, transport, industry and agriculture end-use sectors.

  • Commercial Building Analysis Tool for Energy-Efficient Retrofits (COMBAT)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The Commercial Building Analysis Tool for Energy-Efficiency Retrofit (COMBAT) is created to facilitate policy makers, facility managers, and building retrofit practitioners to estimate commercial (public) buildings retrofit energy saving, cost and payback period. Common commercial building models area created, and the retrofit measures and their effects are pre-computed by EnergyPlus by taking different building types and measures interactions into account.

  • Local Energy Efficiency Policy Calculator (LEEP-C)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    The tool provides the opportunity to analyse the impacts of 23 different policy types from 4 energy-using sectors:

    1. public buildings,
    2. commercial buildings,
    3. residential buildings, and
    4. transportation.

    Impacts of policy choices are analysed in terms of energy savings, cost savings, pollution reduction, and other outcomes over a time period set by the user. The tool also allows for assigning the weights to different policy options based on community priorities in order to tailor policy development process to community goals.

  • Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Germany
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    The Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht-Zentrum für Material-und Küstenforschung GmbH (HZG) is one of 18 members of the Helmholtz Association of German Research Centres Germany's largest science organization. One of HZG's scientific organizational entities is the Climate Service Center Germany (GERICS), a think tank for innovations in the field of climate services.