Connecting countries to climate technology solutions
English Arabic Chinese (Simplified) French Russian Spanish Yoruba

Central African Republic

Official Name:
Central African Republic

National Designated Entity

Type of organisation:
Government/Ministry
Name:
Mr. Maxime Thierry Dongbada-Tambano
Position:
Coordonnateur du projet d'Evaluation des Besoins Technologiques
Phone:
002 36 75 54 56 74, 002 367226 1179
Emails:
dongbada2001@yahoo.fr

Energy profile

Central African Republic (2012)

Type: 
Energy profile
Energy profile
Extent of network

Regarding the sub-sector electricity, supply is unable to meet demand. In 2010, the rate of access of the population to electricity was 4% at national level, 15% in Bangui, 1% in secondary centres and near 0.0% in the rural environment, home to most of the country’s poorest populations. The country’s grid system is as follows:High voltage grid: 110 kV - 84 km;Medium voltage grid: 15 kV - 290 km; and,Low voltage grid: 220 V - 433 km.There is an interconnection with the Democratic Republic of Congo, to convey power produced at the Mobaye hydro-electric dam.

Renewable energy potential

Solar energySolar energy is also a viable option, with average horizontal irradiation reaching 6.0 kWh/m2/day in some regions. Global irradiance in the country ranges from 2,000 to 2,400 kWh/ m2. Owing to its high cost, this technology could be reserved for specific applications, such as pumping for general water supply or for powering telecommunication systems as well as for low-energy applications, such as low-consumption lamps, radios and televisions, telephone recharging and small computing equipment.Wind energyThe potential for wind energy is present, with some sites having average wind speeds in excess of 5 m/s. However, wind power use is still largely unexplored in the country.Biomass energyTraditional biomass use for heating and lighting is still prevalent. According to studies, the biomass intensity of the Central African Republic is currently sustainable. No studies have been conducted as to possible non-traditional biomass use in the country. Over 50% of the country is covered with some form of forest, of which approximately 10% is currently being used as an energy resource.Geothermal energyNo study has currently been undertaken to determine the geothermal potential of the Republic.HydropowerThe role of renewable energy technologies is most likely to progress with the electrification of the main towns in the country by the exploitation of hydropower. Currently the Mbali River, a tributary of the Oubangui in the Boali region north-east of Bangui, is considered to have impressive hydro-electric potential. This region is the main centre for hydropower production in the country. Some areas that are considered priorities for small or micro hydro development include: Bocaranga, Paoua, Baboua, Bossangoa, Ndélé, Sibut, Bangassou, Bria, Kembe, Bambari, Bouar, Carnot, Berbérati, Kaga- Bandoro and Mbaîki (ENERCA, 2009). Major potential large-hydropower developments include the 300 MW Palambo project, 65 km North of Bangui, initially proposed as part of a wider project to improve water flow into Lake Chad. However, the necessary investment for this project is approximately US$ 450 million, and hence further project development has been slow since the initial proposal.

Energy framework

The Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper 2008-2010 (PRSP) sets as a main objective the improvement of the national energy infrastructure, in order to ensure that power provision can be carried out, as well as guaranteeing the improvement of the population’s economic life.According to the PRSP, major short and medium-term emergency measures will be implemented so that:(i) population groups in urban and rural areas can access quality energy services at a lower cost, and(ii) resources are managed in a sustainable fashion via public–private partnership initiatives.To this end, initiatives will be taken, and even boosted in the following areas:(i) reforms will be continued in the electricity and hydrocarbon sub-sectors,(ii) ENERCA will be restructured,(iii) an energy information system will be created and made operational,(iv) the electricity production, transport and distribution capacity of the interconnected (Boali-Bangui) network will be increased,(v) power transfer at a sub-regional and regional level will be promoted,(vi) the electrification of rural areas will be promoted,(vii) micro hydro-electric dams will be constructed,(viii) the regulation capacity of the hydrocarbons markets will be developed,(ix) the decentralisation and reinforcement of storage capacities and the diversification of supply channels will occur, and(x) reductions will be made in the country’s energy dependence.In addition, the government is planning to build a dam on the Kotto at Kembé to produce electricity to supply the uranium and gold mining sites.Currently, Governmental energy policy is focused on three key objectives; upgrading the Boali 1 and 2 hydropower stations and their associated distribution network, up-rating Boali 2 and 3 with the addition of new equipment, and optimising the running of ENERCA to improve economic performance.

Source
Static Source:
  • Communicating Extreme Weather Event Attribution: Research from Kenya and India

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    Climate change attribution analysis assesses the likelihood that a particular extreme weather event has been made more or less likely as a result of anthropogenic climate change. Communication of extreme event attribution information in the immediate aftermath of an extreme event provides a window of opportunity to inform, educate, and affect a change in attitude or behaviour in order to mitigate or prepare for climate change.

  • Hydrological Zoning

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Sectors:

    Hydrological zoning (or simply zoning) is an approach to divide land into different zones based on their hydrological properties. Typically, each type of zone has different land use and development regulations linked to it. This land and water management method aims to protect local water sources from risks of over-abstraction, land salinization, groundwater pollution and waterlogging by managing land use activities based on the assigned hydrological zones.  For example, zones with a high groundwater table, large amounts of surface water (e.g.

  • Energy Efficiency (Policies and Measures Database)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The Energy Efficiency Policies and Measures database provides information on policies and measures taken or planned to improve energy efficiency. The database further supports the IEA G8 Gleneagles Plan of Action mandate to “share best practice between participating governments”, and the agreement by IEA Energy Ministers in 2009 to promote energy efficiency and close policy gaps.

  • Green Resources & Energy Analysis Tool (GREAT)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The GREAT Tool for Cities is an integrated bottom-up, energy end-use based modelling and accounting tool for tracking energy consumption, production and resource extraction in all economic sectors on a city, provincial or regional level. The model uses the Long-range Energy Alternatives Planning System (LEAP) software developed by the Stockholm Environmental Institute and includes a national average dataset on energy input parameters for residential, commercial, transport, industry and agriculture end-use sectors.

  • Commercial Building Analysis Tool for Energy-Efficient Retrofits (COMBAT)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The Commercial Building Analysis Tool for Energy-Efficiency Retrofit (COMBAT) is created to facilitate policy makers, facility managers, and building retrofit practitioners to estimate commercial (public) buildings retrofit energy saving, cost and payback period. Common commercial building models area created, and the retrofit measures and their effects are pre-computed by EnergyPlus by taking different building types and measures interactions into account.

  • Local Energy Efficiency Policy Calculator (LEEP-C)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    The tool provides the opportunity to analyse the impacts of 23 different policy types from 4 energy-using sectors:

    1. public buildings,
    2. commercial buildings,
    3. residential buildings, and
    4. transportation.

    Impacts of policy choices are analysed in terms of energy savings, cost savings, pollution reduction, and other outcomes over a time period set by the user. The tool also allows for assigning the weights to different policy options based on community priorities in order to tailor policy development process to community goals.

  • Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Germany
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    The Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht-Zentrum für Material-und Küstenforschung GmbH (HZG) is one of 18 members of the Helmholtz Association of German Research Centres Germany's largest science organization. One of HZG's scientific organizational entities is the Climate Service Center Germany (GERICS), a think tank for innovations in the field of climate services.    

  • Institut International de l'Écologie Industrielle et de l'Économie Verte

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Switzerland
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    The Institut International de l'Écologie Industrielle et de l'Économie Verte is an establishment of reflection, research and practice of industrial ecology. The Institute has an engineering division and an expertise cluster, which enables the Institute to identify new technologies linked to industrial ecology and to advise through a specific methodology adapted to local contexts. The project managers work on the practical execution of mandates and on the implementation of the industrial ecology with a particular attention to Switzerland and developing countries.