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Botswana

Official Name:
Republic of Botswana

National Designated Entity

Type of organisation:
Name:
Ms. Penny Lesolle
Position:
Researcher
Phone:
+267 3713007, +267 7164 3369
Emails:
plesolle@bitri.co.bw, plesolle@gmail.com

Energy profile

Botswana (2014)

Type: 
Energy profile
Energy profile
Extent of network

Rural electrification has been an important component of the national development agenda for Botswana. However, the high cost of rural grid electrification programmes have been a barrier, with the result that in 2005 approximately 17% of the total rural population had access to grid electricity services, compared to 36% in the urban areas.Current trends in Botswana indicate that 58% of the country’s population had access to electricity in 2012 with a possible 80% by 2016. (Ofetotse & Essah, 2012)

Renewable energy potential

Local energy resources considered to be in abundance in Botswana include coal (200 billion tonnes), sunshine (3,200 hrs at 21MJ/m2), biogas (2.2 million cattle, 3 kg dung/LSU/day) and fuel wood (200 tonnes/annum).SolarBotswana has excellent solar conditions, with an average of 320 clear, sunny days per year and an average global irradiation of 21 MJ m-2/day throughout the country.With 3,200 hours of sunshine a year, solar power is seen as a natural solution to the power shortages of the country and region. The  pioneering concentrating solar thermal power station project in Jwaneng is at the bankable feasibility study stage (December 2012). The plant would produce 100 MW. The solar thermal power industry is still at an early stage of commercial deployment. The Government is involved in the construction of a 1.3 MW photovoltaic power plant in Phakalane, financed through a Japanese grant of P90 million. The plant was commissioned in 08/2012. It is envisaged that such photovoltaic power plants will eventually be replicated elsewhere in the country.Government continues its non-grid rural electrification scheme using photovoltaic power which was kicked started in 2006 by the Government and the UN. A subsidiary of BPC, BPC Lesedi is offering home solar systems to rural consumers, as well as other off grid and renewable energy solutions such as solar power photovoltaic products, rechargeable lanterns and improved and financial support.Biomass & bioenergyThe Botswana National Development Plan 10 (NDP 10) states that there is potential for biofuel production in Botswana using sweet sorghum and Jatropha as feedstocks. The Government is currently focussing on the production of biodiesel. The draft national energy policy states that by 2020, local production of biodiesel will account for 10% of the supply of diesel in the country. (DL Kgathi, 2012) 

Energy framework

Main policies concerning energy sector are Vision 2016, National energy policy, Botswana Energy Master Plan (1996, reviewed 2003):Target is to reach 80% national power access and 60% rural access by 2016Improved access, security and reliability of energy supply to all sectors of the economy, particularly the low income and marginalized;Effective institutional arrangement and governance for the energy sector;Improved capacity for service delivery for all key stakeholders in the energy delivery chainImproved availability of energy information for policy and planning;Minimized energy related environmental, safety and health impacts;Strengthened energy trade and cooperation for enhanced energy security and reduction in costs;Improved energy efficiency for all energy sources in all sectors for economy, increased security and environmental protection;An effective and sustainable energy research and development program that addresses the country’s energy development priorities;Effective private sector participation and investment at all levels in the energy sector.The National Energy Policy has a target of providing 80% access to the country as a whole and 60% access in rural areas by 2016. It aims at improved access, security, and reliability of energy supply to all sectors of the economy, particularly the low income and marginalized through effective institutional arrangement and service delivery.  Botswana’s Vision 2016 recognizes the potential role that solar energy can play in meeting the energy requirements of rural communities not served by the national grid. The Government of Botswana has implemented several strategies to advance the use of renewable energy in Botswana. These include renewable energy feed-in tariffs (REFIT) to encourage greater private sector investment in renewable energy technologies. (Pachauri, R.K., 2013).The Renewable Energy Based Rural Electrification Programme for Botswana (RE  Botswana) is a major programme that was implemented under an agreement between  the Government of Botswana and Global Environment Facility (GEF) managed by  United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). The objective of the programme is to reduce Botswana’s energy related carbon dioxide (emissions and promoting renewable and low greenhouse gas (technologies as a substitute for fossil fuel utilized in rural areas. (Pachauri, R.K., 2013).

Source
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  • Capacity Building hub for Sustainable Energy

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:

    The capacity building hub collaborates with global stakeholders and institutions across the energy value chain, and leverages their mutual strengths to foster attainment of the ambitious goals. The hub undertakes a demand-driven approach to catalyze change. It is a special-purpose vehicle that facilitates - awareness generation/sensitization, knowledge assimilation and dissemination, design and delivery of programmes of change, and identification of research gaps.

  • Lighting a Billion Lives

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:

    Lighting a Billion Lives is a global initiative to facilitate clean energy access and the delivery of last mile energy services for basic and productive use. The initiative enables energy poor communities to transition from traditional and inefficient energy sources to modern, more efficient and sustainable energy solutions. The initiative accelerates market development for clean energy technologies through knowledge sharing, capacity building and market seeding.

  • GRIHA (Green Rating for Integrated Habitat Assessment)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:

    GRIHA (Green Rating for Integrated Habitat Assessment) is a rating tool that helps people assesses the performance of their building against certain nationally acceptable benchmarks. It evaluates the environmental performance of a building holistically over its entire life cycle, thereby providing a definitive standard for what constitutes a ‘green building’. The rating system, based on accepted energy and environmental principles, seeks to strike a balance between the established practices and emerging concepts, both national and international.

  • Specialized Library on Climate Change

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:

    The Specialized Library on Climate Change houses wide array of resources on climate change related issues, both in print and electronic form. The website provides information about all the resources and services offered by the library. The library catalogue of print and electronic resources and database of literature abstracts can be accessed on-line. Current awareness services like listing of new arrivals and compilation of latest news and events are also provided on-line.

  • ENVIS Centre on Renewable Energy and Environment

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    Publication
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    Objective:
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    The major objectives of the ENVIS Centre are collection and dissemination of information in order to support and promote research, development and innovation among researcher, policy makers, academics and other stakeholders. The Centre is actively engaged in data gaps identification and bridging, resource generation and data collection, capacity-building and information dissemination activities.

  • Good Practice Study on GHG-Inventories for the Waste Sector in Non-Annex l Countries

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Sectors:

    The study aims to provide comprehensive guidance to policy makers and practitioners in developing countries [Non-Annex I countries to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC)] for the preparation of national greenhouse gas (GHG) inventories for the waste sector. Though GHG emissions from the waste sector are still comparatively low compared to other sectors, they are continuously rising in developing countries due to changing production and consumption patterns. Experience shows that emissions from this sector can be reduced significantly at relatively low costs.

  • Broschüre “Cool bleiben: Das Spannungsfeld zwischen Wachstum, Kühlung und Klimawandel“

    Type: 
    Publication
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    Objective:

    1. Steigender Energiebedarf und ein Recht auf Kühlung? Darf es ihn geben, den Anspruch auf eine Klimaanlage und einen Kühlschrank – ähnlich wie das Recht auf eine Heizung? 2. Kühle Kette für eine gesunde Versorgung Nach Schätzungen der Weltgesundheitsorganisation (WHO) verderben durchschnittlich 30 Prozent, in tropischen Ländern sogar 50 Prozent der Lebensmittel mangels angemessener Lagerung. 3. Grüne Technik und Wertschöpfung Das Zauberwort heißt Ressourceneffizienz. Der Schlüssel in der Kältetechnik dafür sind natürliche Gase. 4.

  • Buenas Practicas de refrigeración

    Type: 
    Publication
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    Objective:

    This manual should provide professional guidance on how to service and maintain refrigeration systems operating with new technology, e.g. ozone- and climate-friendly alternative refrigerants to CFCs and HCFCs. It addresses essential know-how on containment of HFC refrigerants which have a high global warming potential (GWP) and provides information on the safe use of environmental-friendly natural refrigerants, such as CO2, ammonia or hydrocarbons.

  • Cool und nachhaltig: Kühlung in der internationalen Zusammenarbeit

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    Publication
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    Kühlschrank und Klimaanlage – sie stehen ganz oben auf der Wunschliste von Menschen in heißen Ländern. Bis zum Jahr 2030 rechnet die Internationale Energieagentur (IEA) mit einem viermal höheren Energiebedarf für Klimatisierung in den Entwicklungs- und Schwellenländern im Vergleich zu heute. Auch werden oft chemisch hergestellte Gase als Kühlmittel eingesetzt. Sie schädigen die Ozonschicht und treiben den Klimawandel voran. Grüne Technologien nutzen hingegen natürliche Gase zur Kälteerzeugung, sind energieeffizienter und können mit Sonnen- oder Windkraft betrieben werden.