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Bahamas

Official Name:
Commonwealth of the Bahamas
Region:

National Designated Entity

Type of organisation:
Government/Ministry
Name:
Ms. Rhianna Neely
Position:
Environment Officer
Phone:
+12423226005
Emails:
rneelybest@gmail.com

Energy profile

Bahamas (2012)

Type: 
Energy profile
Energy profile
Extent of network

The Bahamas is unique in that its electricity system is distributed among some 16 isolated island grids. Thus expansion is incremental, and generation capacity is primarily small diesel plants with a capacity of 20MW and less. In spite of the distributed layout of the system, BEC charges a single rate structure for its customers. The Bahamas has nearly complete electrification at about 99% overall and 100% for Grand Bahama.The majority of the electricity infrastructure is concentrated on New Providence, which holds roughly two-thirds of the nation's population. 

Renewable energy potential

RE resources have yet to be exploited in the Bahamas in any significant way. Solar energyThe Bahamian government implemented incentives for solar equipment in 2008, by decreasing import duties from 42% to 10%. The hospitality industry has shown some interest in solar devices, and several PV and SWH distributors have entered the market. The Bahamas have good solar resources for flat-panel PV and solar hot water systems with GHI averaging over 5.3 kWh/m2/day. While this is somewhat less than other islands in the Caribbean, the high price of power means PV and SHW systems are still economically viable. The direct normal irradiation (DNI) resource is far poorer, suggesting that concentrated solar would perform poorly in this region.Wind energyWind data is being measured on Grand Bahama Island in a joint project between GBP and shareholder Emera. The assessment project involves towers at seven sites across the island, at a cost of USD 263,600. Following the assessment, GBP may install up to 15 MW of wind capacity by 2012.Biomass energyWaste-to-energy currently represents the more immediate initiative to increase power supplies in the short term, while at the same time improving air quality, reducing pollution and illegal burning of wastes and fires on the public landfills. Additional environmental benefits include the reduction of top soil to entomb waste, recovery of recyclable materials and the reduction of the seepage of contaminants into the subsurface.OTECOcean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) processes also represent an exploitable renewable resource.  As the Bahamas Banks are characterised by steep drop-offs, most of the major islands have a location where OTEC technology would be feasible; however, this technology is at the experimental stage.  Seawater district cooling could also be used in these locations, but there are few with appreciable demands for it. Deep-well reverse thermal conversion may also be an exploitable source of energy.Geothermal/HydropowerThere has been little investigation into the potentials for these resources in the Bahamas, although studies indicate some geothermal potential in the Green Bahamas Bank region.

Energy framework

There is no clear national policy supporting the implementation of grid-connected RE / WE projects and EE measures. Recognizing that Bahamas depends on imported fuels to satisfy over 99% of its energy demand and since electricity is projected to grow at 8% over the next five years as a result of several new developments, in 2008 the Government of the Bahamas (GoBH) decided to commit to the following National Energy Vision:“The Bahamas will become a world leader in the development and implementation of sustainable energy opportunities by aggressively re-engineering our legislative, regulatory and institutional frameworks; retooling our human resources; and implementing a diverse range of well researched and regulated, environmentally sensitive and sustainable energy programs and initiatives, built upon geographical (both proximity and diversity), climatic ( sun, wind and sea) and traditional economic strengths (tourism and banking).”To support this vision, the GoBH has appointed the National Energy Policy Committee (NEPC) that has drafted a preliminary National Energy Policy. The draft is under revision by an external consultant financed by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB). To date, the NEP has not been adopted by the government as policy.Sustainable Energy Projects in the BahamasThe Bahamas received an IDB grant for Implementing Sustainable Energy Projects by the end of 2009. This programme will: (i) provide technical assistance to the GoBH to achieve EE in public buildings, the residential and commercial sectors,  in particular the phase-out of incandescent lights by replacing them with CFLs and installation of Solar Water Heater (SWH) systems in households; (ii) implement pilot projects in RE, particularly a demonstration project for household Photovoltaic (PV) systems connected to the grid using net metering devices; (iii) strengthen the energy sector in Bahamas; (iv) support the Government with a review of energy legislation, regulatory and policy issues to promote sustainable energy as well as institutional strengthening in the areas EE and RE.

Source
Static Source:
  • Communicating Extreme Weather Event Attribution: Research from Kenya and India

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    Climate change attribution analysis assesses the likelihood that a particular extreme weather event has been made more or less likely as a result of anthropogenic climate change. Communication of extreme event attribution information in the immediate aftermath of an extreme event provides a window of opportunity to inform, educate, and affect a change in attitude or behaviour in order to mitigate or prepare for climate change.

  • Hydrological Zoning

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Sectors:

    Hydrological zoning (or simply zoning) is an approach to divide land into different zones based on their hydrological properties. Typically, each type of zone has different land use and development regulations linked to it. This land and water management method aims to protect local water sources from risks of over-abstraction, land salinization, groundwater pollution and waterlogging by managing land use activities based on the assigned hydrological zones.  For example, zones with a high groundwater table, large amounts of surface water (e.g.

  • Energy Efficiency (Policies and Measures Database)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The Energy Efficiency Policies and Measures database provides information on policies and measures taken or planned to improve energy efficiency. The database further supports the IEA G8 Gleneagles Plan of Action mandate to “share best practice between participating governments”, and the agreement by IEA Energy Ministers in 2009 to promote energy efficiency and close policy gaps.

  • Green Resources & Energy Analysis Tool (GREAT)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The GREAT Tool for Cities is an integrated bottom-up, energy end-use based modelling and accounting tool for tracking energy consumption, production and resource extraction in all economic sectors on a city, provincial or regional level. The model uses the Long-range Energy Alternatives Planning System (LEAP) software developed by the Stockholm Environmental Institute and includes a national average dataset on energy input parameters for residential, commercial, transport, industry and agriculture end-use sectors.

  • Commercial Building Analysis Tool for Energy-Efficient Retrofits (COMBAT)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The Commercial Building Analysis Tool for Energy-Efficiency Retrofit (COMBAT) is created to facilitate policy makers, facility managers, and building retrofit practitioners to estimate commercial (public) buildings retrofit energy saving, cost and payback period. Common commercial building models area created, and the retrofit measures and their effects are pre-computed by EnergyPlus by taking different building types and measures interactions into account.

  • Local Energy Efficiency Policy Calculator (LEEP-C)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    The tool provides the opportunity to analyse the impacts of 23 different policy types from 4 energy-using sectors:

    1. public buildings,
    2. commercial buildings,
    3. residential buildings, and
    4. transportation.

    Impacts of policy choices are analysed in terms of energy savings, cost savings, pollution reduction, and other outcomes over a time period set by the user. The tool also allows for assigning the weights to different policy options based on community priorities in order to tailor policy development process to community goals.

  • Institut International de l'Écologie Industrielle et de l'Économie Verte

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Switzerland
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    The Institut International de l'Écologie Industrielle et de l'Économie Verte is an establishment of reflection, research and practice of industrial ecology. The Institute has an engineering division and an expertise cluster, which enables the Institute to identify new technologies linked to industrial ecology and to advise through a specific methodology adapted to local contexts. The project managers work on the practical execution of mandates and on the implementation of the industrial ecology with a particular attention to Switzerland and developing countries.

  • Centro GlobalCAD 3.0 SL

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Spain
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    GlobalCAD is formed by a group of international experts specialized in fields related to human and sustainable development. They provide technical and strategic advice, research and capacity building to international organizations, governments, NGOs and private sector organizations worldwide.