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Benin

Official Name:
Republic of Benin

National Designated Entity

Type of organisation:
Name:
Mr. Aminou Raphiou Adissa
Position:
Direction Generale de la Gestion des Changements Climatiques
Phone:
+229 95223 089
Emails:
aminou_raphiou@yahoo.fr

Energy profile

Benin (2012)

Type: 
Energy profile
Energy profile
Extent of network

National Electrification Rate (2009): 25%Urban: 53%Rural: 2%Important differences in access to electricity remain between urban and rural populations. Whereas 53% of urban dwellers have access to electricity, only 2% of rural residents do. Lack of adequate and reliable supply of electricity has forced more than 60% of the population to rely on biomass as their primary energy source.

Renewable energy potential

Solar energyThe solar energy potential of Benin varies between 3.9 kWh/m² and 6.2 kWh/m². Currently, 448 kW of PV installations are operational, primarily for villages, health centres, and telecommunications, funded by the government or the Islamic Development Bank.Wind energyAccording to the National Meteorological Office, the wind speed varies between 3 and 6 m/s. More detailed information is not available; therefore it is not possible to give a complete overview of the existing potential.Biomass energyThe potential of wood energy includes contributions generated through National Reforestation Campaigns, as well as allocations of the National Wood Resources Office. The objective of the dedicated firewood project is to increase the supply of wood energy by enlarging plantations in the south of Benin.  Besides traditional wood energy, a substantial potential of about 5 million tons is identified from agricultural residues.There are currently only a few production capacities for ethanol. For example, the Benin sugar plant, operated by “Sucrerie Complant du Bénin“ (SUCOBE), produces 40,000 tons of sugar and 4,200 m³ of ethanol per year. The YUEKEN Benin International plant has an output of 3,000 m³ of ethanol per year, derived from cassava. Due to the missing distribution infrastructure this production is not used for energy or transport purposes.BiofuelsVarious oils like pourghère, castor, palm, cotton, soy and peanut oils could be used for the production of biodiesel. In Benin there are few plants that can process vegetable oil to transport fuels. Two installations with a combined capacity of 210,000 tons are located in Bohicon. Furthermore, there is a palm oil plant in Hinvi. The capacities of these plants are not fully exploited, with currently only 30% being used.The utilization of ethanol at an admixture rate of 15 % will create a market for roughly 33 million litres per annum. A recent survey identified a potential of 116 million litres in 2015 and 229 million litres in 2020. If the market of the European Union is taken into account, these figures are even higher.Geothermal energyNo study has been conducted into geothermal potential of Benin. The country has little change in elevation, and little active volcanism, suggesting a low potential.HydropowerBenin has a significant potential for hydropower. A recent survey shows the Oueme River is sufficient for  twenty sites with a total capacity of 760 MW, and annual output of more than 280 GWh. Approximately 80 other sites are equipped with small-scale hydro installations for rural electrification.

Energy framework

Benin does have high potential for renewable energy. Renewable energy is viewed as an option for increasing energy independence and reducing the reliance on expensive energy imports. Consequently, the national objective is to increase the electricity production and to promote a significant contribution of renewable energy to the overall energy supply of Benin. The stated objective of state policy is to cover the whole territory within the next two decades.The national strategy is to facilitate private sector involvement in rural electrification. The country has been divided into 15 zones, known as Concessions for Rural Electrification (REB). Localities within each zone can develop initiatives for the electrification of their area, but there are also calls for bids for concessions. Within the REBs, Priority Programmes for Rural Electrification (PPRA) are the electrification of localities identified as priorities. There are 4 concessions currently under development. In order to enable consistent resources to finance rural electrification, the government has created a rural electrification fund (ERF). This fund is drawn from a combination of resources such as state grants, donor funding, gifts and bequests and taxes on electricity production. Nevertheless, the rural electrification programme is currently under funded.

Source
Static Source:
  • Capacity Building hub for Sustainable Energy

    Type: 
    Publication
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    The capacity building hub collaborates with global stakeholders and institutions across the energy value chain, and leverages their mutual strengths to foster attainment of the ambitious goals. The hub undertakes a demand-driven approach to catalyze change. It is a special-purpose vehicle that facilitates - awareness generation/sensitization, knowledge assimilation and dissemination, design and delivery of programmes of change, and identification of research gaps.

  • Lighting a Billion Lives

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:

    Lighting a Billion Lives is a global initiative to facilitate clean energy access and the delivery of last mile energy services for basic and productive use. The initiative enables energy poor communities to transition from traditional and inefficient energy sources to modern, more efficient and sustainable energy solutions. The initiative accelerates market development for clean energy technologies through knowledge sharing, capacity building and market seeding.

  • GRIHA (Green Rating for Integrated Habitat Assessment)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:

    GRIHA (Green Rating for Integrated Habitat Assessment) is a rating tool that helps people assesses the performance of their building against certain nationally acceptable benchmarks. It evaluates the environmental performance of a building holistically over its entire life cycle, thereby providing a definitive standard for what constitutes a ‘green building’. The rating system, based on accepted energy and environmental principles, seeks to strike a balance between the established practices and emerging concepts, both national and international.

  • Specialized Library on Climate Change

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:

    The Specialized Library on Climate Change houses wide array of resources on climate change related issues, both in print and electronic form. The website provides information about all the resources and services offered by the library. The library catalogue of print and electronic resources and database of literature abstracts can be accessed on-line. Current awareness services like listing of new arrivals and compilation of latest news and events are also provided on-line.

  • ENVIS Centre on Renewable Energy and Environment

    Type: 
    Publication
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    Objective:
    Sectors:

    The major objectives of the ENVIS Centre are collection and dissemination of information in order to support and promote research, development and innovation among researcher, policy makers, academics and other stakeholders. The Centre is actively engaged in data gaps identification and bridging, resource generation and data collection, capacity-building and information dissemination activities.

  • Good Practice Study on GHG-Inventories for the Waste Sector in Non-Annex l Countries

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Sectors:

    The study aims to provide comprehensive guidance to policy makers and practitioners in developing countries [Non-Annex I countries to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC)] for the preparation of national greenhouse gas (GHG) inventories for the waste sector. Though GHG emissions from the waste sector are still comparatively low compared to other sectors, they are continuously rising in developing countries due to changing production and consumption patterns. Experience shows that emissions from this sector can be reduced significantly at relatively low costs.

  • Broschüre “Cool bleiben: Das Spannungsfeld zwischen Wachstum, Kühlung und Klimawandel“

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    1. Steigender Energiebedarf und ein Recht auf Kühlung? Darf es ihn geben, den Anspruch auf eine Klimaanlage und einen Kühlschrank – ähnlich wie das Recht auf eine Heizung? 2. Kühle Kette für eine gesunde Versorgung Nach Schätzungen der Weltgesundheitsorganisation (WHO) verderben durchschnittlich 30 Prozent, in tropischen Ländern sogar 50 Prozent der Lebensmittel mangels angemessener Lagerung. 3. Grüne Technik und Wertschöpfung Das Zauberwort heißt Ressourceneffizienz. Der Schlüssel in der Kältetechnik dafür sind natürliche Gase. 4.

  • Buenas Practicas de refrigeración

    Type: 
    Publication
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    Objective:

    This manual should provide professional guidance on how to service and maintain refrigeration systems operating with new technology, e.g. ozone- and climate-friendly alternative refrigerants to CFCs and HCFCs. It addresses essential know-how on containment of HFC refrigerants which have a high global warming potential (GWP) and provides information on the safe use of environmental-friendly natural refrigerants, such as CO2, ammonia or hydrocarbons.

  • Cool und nachhaltig: Kühlung in der internationalen Zusammenarbeit

    Type: 
    Publication
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    Objective:

    Kühlschrank und Klimaanlage – sie stehen ganz oben auf der Wunschliste von Menschen in heißen Ländern. Bis zum Jahr 2030 rechnet die Internationale Energieagentur (IEA) mit einem viermal höheren Energiebedarf für Klimatisierung in den Entwicklungs- und Schwellenländern im Vergleich zu heute. Auch werden oft chemisch hergestellte Gase als Kühlmittel eingesetzt. Sie schädigen die Ozonschicht und treiben den Klimawandel voran. Grüne Technologien nutzen hingegen natürliche Gase zur Kälteerzeugung, sind energieeffizienter und können mit Sonnen- oder Windkraft betrieben werden.