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Armenia

Official Name:
Republic of Armenia
Region:

National Designated Entity

Type of organisation:
Specialized agency
Name:
Mr. Mikael Abovyan
Position:
President of the Board of Technology Transfer Association UJP
Phone:
+37410 55 62 53
Emails:
mikael.abovyan@gmail.com

Energy profile

Armenia (2012)

Type: 
Energy profile
Energy profile
Extent of network

N/A

Renewable energy potential

Hydropower The hydro potential of Armenia has been evaluated to be about 21.8 billion kWh/year, including 18.6 billion kWh from large and medium rivers and 3.2 billion kWh from small rivers. According to the Renewable Energy Armenia webpage, the economically feasible hydropower potential is about 3.6 billion kWh, with 1.5 billion kWh already utilized. The remaining hydropower potential is to be developed during the next 15 years. The total output of large and small hydropower existing in the country, as of January 2011, is 1,256 MW or 3,746 million kWh. There are 70 small hydroelectric plants operating with an installed capacity of 89 MW; in January 2009, building licences were issued for 64, and more are foreseen, along with several major plants.WindThe average annual wind velocity in Armenia is distributed unevenly in the range of 1.0 to 8.0 meters per second. In some regions, particularly in the Ararat Valley, strong mountain valley winds are quite common. For instance, during the summer months the velocity of these winds oftentimes reaches 20 m/s or more. Despite a relatively attractive wind regime in many parts of the country, the only operational wind power facility in Armenia today is the 2.6 MW Lori-1 pilot wind power project comprised of four 660 kW Iranian-assembled Vestas wind turbines.  A second, the Iran-Armenia Wind Farm, is under construction.BiomassBiomass energy in Armenia has the potential to provide significant power, if utilized. Armenia has reasonable areas of land covered by forests and lands for agricultural industry, including farming of plants and animals. These areas can potentially produce residues which could be used as fuel for biomass combustion or gasification, as well as biogas production through anaerobic digestion. Forest residues (slash from forest thinnings or waste wood from sawmills) can provide a concentrated resource to be used as fuel for energy production. Agricultural residues can provide a range of residues, including crop residues (corn stover, nutshells, fruit tree branches, etc.) and animal wastes.SolarArmenia is rich in solar energy resources, the utilization of which will reduce the need for imports of other energy sources. The average annual solar radiation is approximately 1,720 kWh/m2 compared to the average annual European solar radiation of 1,000 kWh/m2. Over a quarter of the territory of the country has solar resources with an intensity of 1,850 kWh/m2.The need to promote EE in Armenia is going to increase due to the fact that the upcoming decommissioning of the nuclear power plant by 2016 requires the country to develop RE. Additionally, Armenia is a signatory of such international agreements as Copenhagen Accord, under which the country has committed to increasing energy production based on RE sources and improving EE in all sectors of the economy, as well as in buildings and construction. Better use of the potential of EE will limit the dependency of the country on imported fuel.GeothermalRecent geologic surveys funded by the World Bank show that on the Syunik volcanic plateau, the Jermaghbyur region presents the best region for extracting geothermal power. The water temperature at 2500-3000 m is about 250o C. Using single flash technology this site can produce approximately 25 MW of electric power.  In addition to Jermaghpyur, two more geothermal sites; Karkar and Gridzor are being investigated under the WB/Geo-Fund.

Energy framework

Currently, the "Energy Law of the Republic of Armenia" guarantees the market for electricity produced by all small hydropower plants (SHPPs, total capacity up to 10 MW per plant) in Armenia. According to this Law (Article 59, Clause 1.c), adopted by the Armenian Parliament in April 2001, "All electricity (capacity) generated at small hydro power plants, as well as from renewable sources of energy within the next 15 years shall be purchased pursuant to the Market Rules".As of January 2009, the announced feed in tariff is approximately 0.09 USD/kWh (31.343 AMD/KWh) without value added tax. Some of the basic principles of the policy are as followsEnhancement of competition and efficient operation in the energy sector.Regulation on energy sector operations.Protection and balance of interests between consumers and economic entities.Efficient use of domestic and alternative sources of energy, and the creation of economic and legal mechanisms to serve that purpose.Encouragement of investments, safety and environmental protection in the energy sector.Separation of the generation, transmission, and distribution system operator.Energy Saving and Renewable Energy LawAccording to the Energy Saving and Renewable Energy Law, ratified in December 2004, the principles of Armenian policy in energy saving and renewable energy are:1) Increasing the level of supply of indigenous renewable energy carriers to satisfy the energy demand of the economy,2) Implementation of energy saving strategies, as well as development and enforcement of legal and economic mechanisms for the promotion of renewable energy,3) Ensuring increasing usage of renewable energy resources as well as the application and development of new renewable energy technologies aimed at its promotion,4) Ensuring competitiveness of renewable energy resources and protection/enforcement of the rights of businesses engaged in the area of renewable energy,5) Ensuring high priority of issues of environmental protection and efficient (economic) usage of natural resources while implementing measures/activities aimed at the development of energy saving and renewable energy; etc.According to the Law, legal and physical persons using, producing and importing energy devices can submit those in the manner established by the Law on Certification of Compliance of Goods and Services with Normative Requirements for voluntary certification based on energy efficiency indicators. The costs are, however, carried by the mentioned legal (physical) persons. Further, all certified energy devices will be labelled.Water CodeThis Code, which has been adopted on 4 June 2002, establishes procedures to obtain water permit for hydro power plants. According to this Code water permit for a hydro power plant is given for 3 years at the first, but once the plant is operational or even it is under construction, then the permit is extended for a much longer period. The purpose of this provision is to prevent people getting a water permit and then not proceeding to construct the project. However, land lease for the project outlined in the Land Code dated 2 May 2001 is not in synch with this provision because there are not such time limits for the land lease.Land CodeProcedures to obtain the right to use the land for an energy related project, such a SHPP, are outlined in this code. Land can either be leased or purchased. The general plan of various areas does not have specific land parcels identified as of energy type use. Therefore, procedures in this code need to be followed to change the land us category. A governmental decision is required for any land use category change.

Source
Static Source:
  • Communicating Extreme Weather Event Attribution: Research from Kenya and India

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    Climate change attribution analysis assesses the likelihood that a particular extreme weather event has been made more or less likely as a result of anthropogenic climate change. Communication of extreme event attribution information in the immediate aftermath of an extreme event provides a window of opportunity to inform, educate, and affect a change in attitude or behaviour in order to mitigate or prepare for climate change.

  • Hydrological Zoning

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Sectors:

    Hydrological zoning (or simply zoning) is an approach to divide land into different zones based on their hydrological properties. Typically, each type of zone has different land use and development regulations linked to it. This land and water management method aims to protect local water sources from risks of over-abstraction, land salinization, groundwater pollution and waterlogging by managing land use activities based on the assigned hydrological zones.  For example, zones with a high groundwater table, large amounts of surface water (e.g.

  • Pöyry Austria GmbH

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Austria
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    Pöyry Austria GmbH, a member of the global Pöyry Group, is a consulting and engineering company with deep expertise with extensive local knowledge to deliver sustainable project investments. For instance, its Hydro Consulting department delivers services in the fields of hydrological and hydraulic modellingand forecasting. Its experts have significant experience in the fields of hydro-meteorology, climate change and climate sensitivity. They also contribute to assess climate risk and ctimate adaptation measures for hydropower and all other sectors of water management.

  • Energy Efficiency (Policies and Measures Database)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The Energy Efficiency Policies and Measures database provides information on policies and measures taken or planned to improve energy efficiency. The database further supports the IEA G8 Gleneagles Plan of Action mandate to “share best practice between participating governments”, and the agreement by IEA Energy Ministers in 2009 to promote energy efficiency and close policy gaps.

  • Green Resources & Energy Analysis Tool (GREAT)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The GREAT Tool for Cities is an integrated bottom-up, energy end-use based modelling and accounting tool for tracking energy consumption, production and resource extraction in all economic sectors on a city, provincial or regional level. The model uses the Long-range Energy Alternatives Planning System (LEAP) software developed by the Stockholm Environmental Institute and includes a national average dataset on energy input parameters for residential, commercial, transport, industry and agriculture end-use sectors.

  • Commercial Building Analysis Tool for Energy-Efficient Retrofits (COMBAT)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The Commercial Building Analysis Tool for Energy-Efficiency Retrofit (COMBAT) is created to facilitate policy makers, facility managers, and building retrofit practitioners to estimate commercial (public) buildings retrofit energy saving, cost and payback period. Common commercial building models area created, and the retrofit measures and their effects are pre-computed by EnergyPlus by taking different building types and measures interactions into account.

  • Local Energy Efficiency Policy Calculator (LEEP-C)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    The tool provides the opportunity to analyse the impacts of 23 different policy types from 4 energy-using sectors:

    1. public buildings,
    2. commercial buildings,
    3. residential buildings, and
    4. transportation.

    Impacts of policy choices are analysed in terms of energy savings, cost savings, pollution reduction, and other outcomes over a time period set by the user. The tool also allows for assigning the weights to different policy options based on community priorities in order to tailor policy development process to community goals.